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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 14
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 14. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/62.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 14. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/62

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 14, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/62.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_028.jpg
Transcript I4 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. ryptians, and the Greeks. A hundred copyists were constantly employed in transcribe manuscripts. The Kadi sent into all countries men authorised to purchase rare and precious books. After the taking of the city a priest attached to Count Bernard de St. Gilles entered the room in which were collected a vast number of copies of the Koran, and as he declared that " the library of Tripoli contained only the impious books of Mohammed," it was given up to the flames. Ibn Abu Tai says that the library contained three million volumes, and that the Christians exhibited at the taking of Tripoli the same destructive fury as the Arabs had done who burned the library of Alexandria. Novairy fixes the number of volumes at one hundred thousand. In 1289, when the city was destroyed by the Sultan Kilawun, it was said to ha contained four thousand looms for the weaving of silk, and the zinnar Tarabulusy, or Tripoli silk girdle, is famous even to the present day. The Arabs call the city Tarabulus, the Arahic form of Tripoli. The Turks usually speak of it as " Kochuk Sham " (Little Damascus), and it is well worthy of the name. It stands on the eastern extremity of the triangular plain, a mile wide, at the base of the elevated plateau called El Kura, from one hundred to three hundred feet high, which reaches to the foot of the Lebanon range (see page 5). The sacred river Kadisha, which rises at Bsherreh, just under the cedars of Lebanon (« page 475, vol. L), runs twelve miles through a wild ravine to the plain, then cuts through the plateau for eighteen miles in a deep gorge to Tripoli (see pages 1 and 5), where it breaks out into the level plain, forming a tortuous and picturesque valley, at the mouth of which, on both sides of the river, the city of Tripoli is built (see pages 8 and 9). The roaring Kadisha. called by the Muslims Abu Ali, runs through the city, crossed by two stone bridges, besides the new bridge of a tramway farther down the stream. On the right bank, the houses on the hill are chiefly rough structures of the Maronite fellahin ; those below, between the river and the Bab Tibbaneh, being Muslim. The Christian quarter is on the left side of the river, and stretching far to the southern Blacksmith's Gate is the populous Muslim quarter. The population consists of twelve thousand Muslims, four thousand Greek Christians, five hundred Maronites, and a few Protestants, Papal Greeks, and Jews. These sects live in distinct quarters, and the different trades of the city, as in Damascus, occupy separate streets. From a fine fountain five miles south-east of the city, the water of the Zghorta river brought in an aqueduct, which crosses the Kadisha a mile from the city on the Kunatir el Brins, or Prince's Arches, a structure dating back to Raymond of Toulouse, Count of Tripoli. The distributing reservoir is a small room below the castle, whose floor is punctured with holes a few inches in diameter, through which the water flows in earthen pipes to all pari the city. Every house, mosque, and khan has its anbub and birke/t, in which the water runs constantly day and night, giving a cheerful aspect to the houses, refreshing in summer, but chilling and damp in the winter. The houses are built of the yellow porous sandstone from the reefs along the seashore, and there are few dry houses in the city. The ground floors arc