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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 460
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 460. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 460. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/522

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 460, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 460
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_488.jpg
Transcript EDFU AND PHILAE 459 their names; lists also of singers and assistant functionaries; lists of offerings, hymns, invocations; and such a profusion of religious legends as make of the walls of Edfu alone a complete text-book of Egyptian mythology."* just as at Dendarah, a side chapel of the star Sirius (see page 45 7), with strangely painted ceiling, opens out of the chamber on the right of the sanctuary; and close by, a winding staircase of deliciously graduated ascent, whose walls are decorated with a representation of an ascendina procession, leads up to the roof, where are some curious chambers, and one queer little room in the thickness of the roof, entered from above, and closed by a heavy stone which rolled away into an adjoining recess. A straight staircase, with pictures of a descending procession, leads down to the opposite side of the sanctuary to that by which the ascent is made. Even the paving of the courts and passages is perfect. From every point of view the temple of Edfu is magnificent, whether, standing on the steps that lead down from the modern to the old level, one looks up at the smooth creamy walls of the towering pylon,* or, sitting under the colonnade of the great court, one surveys the dark entrance of the hypostyle hall, separated from the court by the low sculptured screen, like the choir of a cathedral, or wanders among the chambers round the sanctuary and along the paved corridor bounded by lofty sculptured walls. But perhaps the view which most delights the artist's eye is that which is obtained from near the entrance to the sanctuary. Overhead rise the columns of the hypostyle hall ; in front, through a deeply shaded vista of columns and portals, appears the great court gleaming in the sunshine, and through the gateway of the mighty pylon which closes the view a vision of the outer world gives life to the scene. Peasant women in their dark blue gowns and brown-clad villagers throng the steps before the pylon, armed with the inevitable " antikas " and fruit of the dom palm and other traps for the unwary traveller. We can forgive them their importunities for the sake of the life and colour they give to a scene which without the relief they afford would be almost overpowering in its stately grandeur. Above Edfu is the gorge called Gebel-es-Silsileh, or Hill of the Chain, because it is fabled that a king once barred the river here with a chain. The Nile has here burst through a strong sandstone barrier, and the scene is a striking one, especially when viewed from the south side. The rocks on either hand, honeycombed with quarries and grottoes of the time of the great Theban dynasties (see page 460), are not high, but their outlines are bold, and the view looking backwards from the broadened river to the narrow mouth (scarcely eleven hundred feet wide) through which the Nile has forced its way, is very picturesque. Above Silsileh the valley becomes a mere ribbon, and the verdure has almost wholly disappeared. The Ptolemaic temple of Kom Ombo (see pages 461, 463) stands out finely upon the eastern bank, over which it is gradually falling in a cascade of masonry, and a little vegetation and even a tiny garden near the temple give colour to the otherwise monotonous scene. Presently the appearance of black rocks jutting out of the river on all sides shows we are approaching the * Miss Amelia B. Edwards, " One Thousand Miles up the Nile."