Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 458
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 458. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/520.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 458. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/520

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 458, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/520.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 458
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_486.jpg
Transcript PICK 'RESOl 'E PALESTINE. pre-eminent offenders, the officers of the French army under Desaix, who pursued the Memluks beyond the < ataract, defaced Philae, and on their return voyage tattooed the interior of Edfu with their obscure names and regiments and their impertinent "An VIII." It is curious that s of Edfu should be of the same nation as its uncoverer. From the top of the pylon we look down upon a wide and beautiful stretch of country, chiefly of desert, yet with a rich expanse of vividly green crops near the winding river, the y mountains beyond, and almost under our feet the village of Edfu, a tangled mass of huts with tunnel-like roofs, or flat roofs covered with durah, and little yards in front, so closely packed and so irregular, that it is impossible to see where one little house ends and the next ruining round, we look down upon the great court of the temple, surrounded by colonnades, with pillars of every form of capital. This is a place of broadest sunshine, but tho hypostyle hall beyond, which is divided from the great court by an intercolumnar screen between the exquisite papyrus-flower pillars, is dim and shaded. A pylon and wall divide tho hypostyle into two portions, somewhat to the detriment of the general effect, and behind is the sanctuary, wherein still stands unbroken a granite shrine cut out of a single block, which must originally have weighed sixty tons, in which the sacred hawk, symbol of Horus, was once jealously concealed. A passage; runs round the sanctuary, and off this open a number of small and very dark chambers. ( hitside these again runs a wider corridor, forming a space between the peculiarly sacred portion of the temple and the enclosing wall, and ending in the great court. The whole of tin; surfaces of the walls on both sides of this passage, and indeed every column and every wall in the temple, are covered with sculptures. The general character of these designs is conventional, the same figures are repeated again and again, until the eye -rows weary of the sight of a uniform king offering uniform gifts to uniform gods; and the tendency to making symmetrical counterparts of the two sides of a door or pylon is a sign of artistic decadence. Nevertheless, the effect of the lofty walls covered with sculptures, towering up on cither hand as one walks round the great corridor, is singularly impressive, in spite of the mutilation which iconoclastic zeal has wrought upon the faces of the divinities. The pictures of boats one with an exquisitely carved sail, in which the king stands, harpoon in hand, to strike the hippopotamus (drawn relatively about the size of a guinea pig) which his men have enmeshed in their ropes—are especially vivid and dramatic. We find here none of those great battle scenes which delighted the soul of Rameses, no epic poems like Centaur's, but chiefly the rites of religion and the interviews between gods and king fhere is, however, a remarkable scientific value in the sculptures of Edfu. There are here -more inscriptions of a miscellaneous character than in any temple of Egypt, and it is precisely this secular information that is to us so priceless. Here are geographical lists of Nubian and Egyptian nomes, with their principal cities, their products, and their tutelary gods ; lists of tributary provinces and princes ; lists of temples, and of the lands pertaining thereunto ; lists of canals, of ports, of lakes; calendars of feasts and fasts; astronomical tables; genealogies and chronologies of the gods; lists of the priests and priestesses of both Edfu and Dendarah, with