Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 4
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 4. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/52.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 4. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/52

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 4, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/52.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_018.jpg
Transcript 4 PICTURESQUE PALESTIN* side, with its apse towards the north-east. A semicircular projection of the northern wall wouM indicate the apse of some former edifice within the wall at that point. The whole mass of ruins is a mystery. It was evidently one of the holy places of th Arvadites, at once a temple and a stronghold. M. Ray, of Paris, in his report on the rem of the military architecture of the Crusaders in Syria, styles this place the b TifuvoK that exists in Syria. Its name," Solomon's Fortress/' would indicate th ^ij^ ancient tradition as to its origin. The whole Arab race believe Ba'albek ,| i\ and Tudmur (Palmyra) (see page 429, vol. i.) to be the work of Solomon aided by the genii and this Phoenician quadrangle very naturally bears his name. It is not impossible that when Solomon went to Hamath Zobah and built store cities or magazines for storil n in this district, his men may have made this a store city. The word Hamath means li or fortress, and the fame of Solomon must have extended through this entin n, then inhabited by the Phoenicians and Hittii md it is no improbable supposition that this retired and almost inaccessible spot may have 1 elected tronghold in which -rain for his subjects in Northern Syria, or even as a military fortre live small temples ere probably of much later dat Leaving this lovely valley we rode to Burj Safita, the" Castel Blanc "of the ' now, with its Protestant church and schools, a veritable white spot in this dark m Thence, <>n the ist of June, we rode down lor six hours over the undulating chalk hills : the coast, when suddenly we dame upon the modern town of Tarttis, the ancient Antai of the Phoenicia! The town contains about one thousand five hundred peopl< Muslims and one fifth Greek Christians. The majority of the people live within the u.t : the castle, an immense structure, whose vaulted halls and chapels, built by the I still in excellent preservation. The castle stands on the seashore, protected from th- by a massive sloping buttress. On the land side the castle was surrounded by tw two moats, one between the walls and one beyond. These are in fine | ition, < on the north-east side. The ancient structures are solid and beautiful, the modern ol the abject character. Taking the Arab shakhtur, or sloop, which plies between the town and its insular we sail across the two and a half miles of sea to the ancient island of Arvad. now Riuul. 1™ island is three-quarters of .1 mile in circumference, with a population ot two thousand. It surrounded by a Wall intended to serve as a fortification, and a dyke to 1 the town In the A portion of the wall still remains, composed ofbl >m fifteen to tv feet in length. The finely drafted stones indicate its Phoenician origin. * inter* full nl cisterns to Supply water to the inhabitai; The inscriptions in Creek begin With 1 words, " Hie Senate and People," & I )n the north-east side was the harbour, termed bjf « moles built Of immense stones brou-ht from the quarries at'Amrit. The | chiefly fishermen, wh< its supply fish to Padakiyeh. Tripoli, and 1 ml c lumber from Mounts Casius and Amanus to the citi thern Phoenicia ^_^__^^__