Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 455
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 455. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/517.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 455. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/517

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 455, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/517.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 455
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_483.jpg
Transcript IMH EDFU AND PIIILJE. above is, however, a gradual one. At first some prosperous towns appear to promis repetition of the scenery below Thebes. Erment, the first important place on th y up, consists of a long row of sugar factories, with many high square tapered chimne) h. if they had but pointed tops and inscriptions on their sides, might be mistaken tor obelisks the unprejudiced eye. A neighbouring temple was lucklessly used in their building, I hen Mutaneh is passed, a European-looking little town, with well-built but too mdahed and terraced and French-windowed houses, overtopped by two huge chimneys, which interrupt a very beautiful bend of the Nile terminating in the curious detached hills known as the Gebeleyn. A little higher up, thirty-five miles above Luxor, is Ksne, an important pla and the capital of a wide-spread province. Dyeing blue cloth seems the main business he and the market-place and streets are adorned with long pieces of blue stuff hang drj on ropes stretched overhead. Weaving is also done lure, and coppersmiths ply then while there is a good deal of business carried on with the Sudan. Ksne has a look about it; it is unusually clean, well built, and prosperous. Some of iis houses are really comfortable-looking, and its mosques, though simple, are not unple with the charan black-and-white decoration of the upper country. In one of them, however, beside a glaril painted pulpit, stands a tall eight-day kitchen clock, in absurd incongruity. Ueyoiul tin: mai buried up to its roof in the accretions of the modern town, is the temple, of whi< h nothing can now be seen but the portico, with its richly carved hell-shaped capitals of die Roman pei and the zodiacal ceiling, and some poor sculptures of Ptolemaic times within. Thirty-two miles above Ksne is the most perfect temple in Egypt, the temple <; I to Horns at EdfO by Ptolemy Philopator, and continued by hi h win temple with Dendarah, but is even more perfect. Until quite recent yeai buried in the modern village, but M. Mariette, with the sanction of the ex-Khedh troyed nearly a hundred I and set the temple free from its invaders. The lofty pylon (see n< plCUOUl feature of the scenery long before Edfu is reached, but after walking over the fields that separate the village from the Nile, crossing the plank that bridges the great canal, and thr< the narrow^, tortuous lanes of the village, we lose sight of the noble towers, and the view of the temple suddenly bursts upon us with a shock. The other temples oi I either ruined or buried; in no single instance elsewhere can w< the temple in its original perfection, but here, at Edfu, the splendid building seems intact, perfect, compk n its architects left it. Except the cornice, the immense pylon is entire; an<l its position, with a space cleared in front and at the sides, gives it a commanding aspect that no other gateway in Egypt possesses. It is not so high as the first pylon of the great temi Karnak, but its wonderful preservation makes its hundred and twenty feet of height infinitely more imposing than the hundred and forty feet of its ruined rival. Two hundred and forty steps ol with rooms opening out of it alternately on either side, lead up to the Bumi each of the twin towers. The chambers and parapet walls at ihe top m <' with not of modern English tourists, but of old travellers like Irby and Man