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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 446
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 446. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/507.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 446. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/507

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 446, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/507.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 446
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_473.jpg
Transcript 446 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. realise that the hospitable abode of Mustafa Agha, the British vice-consul, with its flags, its French carpet, its chair and divans, its photographs and cheap prints, is actually built among the enormous columns of the grand colonnade which connected the first peristyle hall of Rameses II. with the temple of Amenoph III. ; that the French consulate is built over the most sacred parts of this temple ; and that the whole line of buildings that fringe the bank are interwoven into the ruins of one of the most splendid monuments of Egypt. Part of the chief pylon of this double temple is seen in the cut on page 443, with the remaining obelisk and one of the colossi, buried almost up to his shoulders. A column of the great peristyle court of Rameses II. is seen beyond, and some of the mud hovels which (together with the mosque shown on page 442, and in the steel engraving facing page 445) encumber the building. Behind this court is the anomalous colonnade, peristyle court, and sanctuary and surrounding chambers of the original structure built by Amenoph III., as may be seen in the steel engraving, where the great colonnade is above the large sail of the boat in the foreground, and the peristyle hall of Amenoph III. over the dahabiyeh which is moored to the bank, while to the left is seen the minaret of the mosque which stands upon the peristyle court of Rameses IL, and still further the pylon and the widowed obelisk which also appear in the woodcut. The temple of Luxor is the work of only two monarchs, Amenoph III. and Rameses IL, and is therefore comparatively simple. When the mud huts are cleared away, an excellent work which M. Maspero is now attempting, the whole plan will appear coherent and complete. . The curious bend in the axis of the temple, however, and the unexplained colonnade, will still form subjects for speculation, while the wall-pictures at present hidden by the village may be expected to furnish a mass of important historical material. A long dromos or paved causeway, bordered by an avenue of sphinxes, leads from the great pylon of Luxor to Karnak. It is two thousand two hundred yards long, and seventy-six feet broad, and there must have been five hundred sphinxes on each side of it. Most of them are now destroyed, but enough remains to show that for part of the w7ay there were woman-headed sphinxes, and that the rest were rams. This causeway leads up to the beautiful gate of Ptolemy Euergetes, which forms the propylon to the temple of Khons, the pylon of which is seen through it in the cut (page 448). The temple of Khons, however, built by Rameses III., and that of Euergetes beside it, are only two of the eleven temples included in the Karnak group; and the great temple, in the erection of which so many kings united, is some distance further north, and looks in a different direction. The first view of Karnak is rendered all the more confused and perplexing by the circumstance that most of the temples face different points of the compass. The great temple, indeed, faces the west, i.e. the Nile, as it should, and as most other temples do. But the subsidiary temple of Khons faces south, while the temple of Mout looks to the north. There is, however, a reason for these positions. The temple of Khons looks towards the south because that is the direction ot Luxor, with which it is connected by the long avenue of sphinxes. The temple of Mout,