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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 445
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 445. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/506.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 445. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/506

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 445, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/506.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 445
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_472.jpg
Transcript THEBi 445 portions of the temple. On great high days and festivals certain privileged persona might allowed to view the processions from the open or even the hypostyle court. But temple is not calculated for the use of crowds. The procession ; from th, down the chief avenue of the hypostyle hall would be but imperfectly seen b) people sides, where the forest of columns would shut out most of thr spectacle. " I he hypostyle hall was lofty and wide in order that it might be a vestibule worthy of the god who dwelt in die sanctuary beyond it, and in order that it might bear witness to the piety, wealth, and p the king who constructed it. It offered no place in which the faithful could assemble fa to religious discourses, to unite in the expression of their faith and hope, to sing and pray in common. In virtue of the sanctuary which was its nucleus, the temple was t]1( dwellin the god, the terrestrial resting-place to which the king, his son and the nursli the goddesses, came to offer him thanks and to do homage in return for the | .,, and mum which he received. The temple was also, in virtue; of those numerous . haml > h surrounded the sanctuary, a place for the preparation, consecration, and preservation • •! holj objects: a huge sacristy to which access was forbidden to all but those who w< i ally attached to the service of the god and charged with the custody of th, | furnii Such being the origin and purpose of the temple, we need feel no surj fortification behind which it was entrenched. This fortification consisted, in the first |>la<< the brick wall which formed the outermost enclosure of the wall <-nr\ which embraced the temple proper, leaving a narrow passage only wide enough for the walk « sentry; thirdly, of a wall which divided the really sacred parts of ihe buil pronaos [or hypostyle hall]. Now that the line of the external wall isonl) indicated title swell of the ground, now that the best preserved of the inner walls are broken down in m places [Edftt excepted], and now that the roofs and ceilings have fallen and encumbered floors, it is difficult enough to form a true idea of the former appearance of the I temples. Could we see them as they left their architects' hands, we should be the jealous severity of their isolation, by the austere monotony of th n oi stone which interposed between the eyes of the people and the internal splendours of the building. In this we should find the chief point of distinction between the temples of Egypt and tho « religious edifices of our own times, with which we half involuntarily con 11 oilier w< of the kind."* When we come to apply these generalisations to the immena i **uM known as Luxor and Karnak, we shall find some difficulty in identifying the various part the temple. At Luxor this difficulty is enhanced by the fact that the temple is 1 in a village, mud huts are huddled together within the vistas of columns, rod are stalled in the sanctuary, while the picturesque black and whit *■" mosque stands out against the sky not far from the beautiful obelisk ol «°" has been carried away to the Place de la Concorde at Paris. h il DIM < "> vrrot and Chipiez, Bnglith traililatiotl 1 18