Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 444
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 444. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/505.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 444. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/505

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 444, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/505.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 444
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_471.jpg
Transcript 444 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. was the case at Karnak and Luxor, and, in front of these, obelisks and colossi may be arranged in pairs; but the essential character of the arrangement is the dronios or avenue leading from the outer gate to the temple door. Arrived at the temple itself we are met by another screen. The whole of the building is enclosed by an inner wall, nearly as high as the highest part of the temple, and sometimes adorned, like the pylons, with sculptured scenes. From outside, the temple, when entire, must have presented very much the appearance of a box without a lid. The engraving of Edfu, page 456, shows something of this enclosing wall, springing from the immense pylon and running round the whole of the interior structures, leaving an open corridor between itself and the walls of the rearward halls. Passing through the single pylon which admits us within this second, screen, we find ourselves in what is called the peristyle, that is to say, a large court open in the centre, but surrounded by a narrow cloister supported by a single or double row of columns. From the peristyle we pass by another but lower pylon, often guarded by a pair of-sitting colossi or obelisks or both, into the hypostyle, or hall of assembly, which was originally roofed with immense stone slabs, painted with stars in gold upon a blue ground, supported upon a forest of gigantic columns. Such a hypostyle is the famous " Hall of Columns " of the great temple of Karnak, of which portions are shown on pages 449, 450, and 451. It is the largest hall in Egypt (three hundred and forty by one hundred and seventy feet, and in the centre seventy-six feet high), and its one hundred and thirty-four columns are among the wonders of the world. Twelve of them, forming a central avenue, are thirty-three feet in circumference, or as bulky as Trajan's column, and a hundred men could sit on their enormous bell-shaped capitals. The one hundred and twenty-two side columns are shorter, and form aisles, above which the central nave projects with a kind of clerestory of grated stone windows. It is said that the entire cathedral of Notre-Dame at Paris could stand upon the ground occupied by this one hall at Karnak. Behind the hypostyle, and sometimes separated from it by an open vestibule, with obelisks and colossi, is the sanctuary, the holy of holies, where the emblem of the god was kept in a monolithic shrine; and round the sanctuary itself are the treasure-chambers, robing-rooms, and laboratories for the manufacture of incense and other necessaries of the temple rites, while beneath are sometimes crypts where the most precious and sacred of the treasures were doubtless concealed. The crypts at Dendarah, for example, consist of long and narrow passages with beautifully preserved wall-paintings. The entrance, from the floor of one of the side chambers which surround the sanctuary, was probably concealed by a movable stone like that which figures in the story of the Treasury of Rampsinitus. Thus the principal parts of an Egyptian temple are jealously secluding walls, an avenue of sphinxes, an outer and an inner gate or gates, an open court with cloisters, a covered hall of columns, and a sanctuary surrounded by small chambers. There are no dwelling-places or cells for the priests, nor is there accommodation within the hypostyle hall or sanctuary for a congregation of worshippers. But indeed the public were never admitted into the sacreder