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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 441
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 441. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/502.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 441. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/502

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 441, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/502.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 441
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_468.jpg
Transcript THEBES. ()1- for the recital of common prayer; no public ritual was celebrated within it; no one was admitted to it except the priests and the king The temple was a kind of royal oratory, a monument reared by the king in token of his own piety, and in order to pwthas the gods. -The elaborate decoration with which all the walls of the temples are covered is onlj be explained by admitting this point of departure. Thr essential element oi this is the picture ; many pictures are arranged symmetrically side by side, and tiers pictures cover the walls from floor to ceiling. This arrangement nevei varies, and the same may be said of the general significance of the pictures: on the one hand tin- kin-, on the Other one or more deities—these are the subjects of all the composition The kin- makes an offering (meats, fruits, flowers, emblems) to the god, and asks lor some favour at his hands in his answer the deity grants the favour demanded. "The whole decoration of a temple consisted, therefore, in an act of adoration on tin- part of the monarch repeated in various forms. The temple was. therefore, the exclusive personal monument of the prince by whom it was founded and decorated, This fact explains the presence of those precious representations of battles which adorn tin- external wall temples. The king ascribed all his successes in the field to the immediate protection <»! the gods. In combating the enemies of Egypt, in bringing them by thousands to the capital, in employing them upon the construction of their temples, he was performing an a« I a to the gods as when offering incense, flowers, and the limbs of animals sacrificed. Bj such deeds he proved his piety and merited the continuation of those favours tor which tin I i«< tion of a temple was meant to be an acknowledgment. 4i The ceremonies consisted for the most part in great pr< c< ions, issuing from the sand to be marshalled in the hypostyle hall, and afterwards traversing the open courts which la) between the buildings of the temple and the great wall which encloses the whole. I he\ perambulated the terraced roofs, they launched upon the lake the sacred barque with its ma coloured streamers. Upon a few rare occasions the priests, with th ed images, sallied from the enclosure which ordinarily shielded their rites from profane eyes, and at the head i brilliant flotilla directed their course to some other city, either by the Nile or by th which they called ' the sacred canal.' " * The two chief requisites of an Egyptian temple, therefore, were (i) such an arrangement halls and passages as would allow room for long processions, and (2) strong chambers wherein to store the sacred emblems, barques, vestments, and other costly treasures app rites. In two words, length and strength were the essential qualities of a temple we find the former secured by a series of avenues, halls, and courts, one behind the Other ; whrf< the quality of strength or secrecy was obtained by lofty enclosing walls withoul and skilfully concealed secret chambers within. It is but rarely that the original external appearance of an Egyptian temple can be reali k n'~4 i nAfffiAK Fnulish translation by W. AfflNttOQI * Mariette, apud Perrot and Chipiez, " History of Ancient Egyptian Art, vol L page 435- ^8"