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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 440
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 440. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/501.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 440. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/501

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 440, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/501.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 440
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_467.jpg
Transcript 44o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. hinges of the folding windows. Grotesque caryatids support the balconies under the side windows. The whole tower or gate—donjon keep we should like to call it—is unique in Egyptian architecture, and, like the rest of the buildings of Medinet Habu, leaves an ineffaceable impress on the mind. These four memorial temples all stood on the western plain, on the same side of the river as the tombs in which the kings their builders were buried. Indeed it is rare to find any funeral monuments on the east side of the Nile, Beny Hasan excepted. The notion of the sun's setting in the west, or rather going down into a pit near Abydos, was so closely associated in Egyptian belief with the passage of the soul to the under-world, that a tomb in the west seemed most appropriate for him who must travel the road wherein Osiris had journeyed. The pyramids and all the graves of the great necropolis of Memphis and Sakkarah are on the west of the Nile; and on this side the Theban kings excavated their tombs and built their memorial temples. The eastern bank has also its temples, but they differ from those we have been considering in several important respects. They are not memorial temples built by one sovereign in his own honour, but a collection of temples erected by many kings at different periods in honour of the great Theban triad of gods—Amen, the male, Mout, the female, and Khons, the offspring of the two. Each ruler strove to improve upon the work of his predecessor in raising a worthy fane for the local divinities. One king built a sanctuary, another a huge propylon, a third a hall of columns, a fourth a peristyle court; others added side chambers and subsidiary temples, or adorned the approach with avenues of sphinxes or rams. This aggregate of pious zeal became the national temple, the centre of the worship of Thebes, which once meant the centre of Egypt. The great congeries of temples and portions of temples on the east bank, known now, from the miserable villages that have grown up over them, as Karnak and Luxor, are agglutinations of this kind. King after king has had a hand in increasing or adorning this wonderful group, and from the days of Osirtasen of the Twelfth Dynasty to the age of Ptolemy Physkon, nine dynasties and more than twenty monarchs have had their part in the great work. In the product of twenty-five centuries and innumerable architects it were vain to seek for unity of design, and Karnak is a bewildering heap of ruins in which it is hard to trace the faintest resemblance to the ordinary type of an Egyptian temple. That type is best seen in the later temples by which the Ptolemies worthily carried on the traditions of the Theban empire. Dendarah or Edfu, by reason partly of their better preservation, partly because their architecture had become organized and defined by the influence of Greek method and precision, offer clearer examples of the Egyptian temple than Karnak, and the student may most easily advance from the consideration of one of these well-arranged Ptolemaic temples to the study of the more complex and indefinite temples of Thebes. Mariette has well said :— " The Egyptian temple must not be confused. with that of Greece, with the Christian church, or with the Mohammadan mosque. It was not a place for the meeting of the faithful