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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 2
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 2. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/50.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 2. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/50

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 2, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/50.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_016.jpg
Transcript 2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. One of the most striking historic names in Northern Syria is KuTat Kadmus, about twelve hours south-east of Ladakiyeh, probably the former home of Cadmus, who first brought letters into Greece. In prosecuting our journey through Phoenicia from north to south we will begin at the northernmost relic of Phoenician architecture in Syria, the secluded " Husn Suleiman." In company with the Rev. S. Jessup, of Tripoli, and Professor Dodge, of the S. P. College in Beirut, we visited this then unexplored and comparatively unknown ruin a few years since. We spent Tuesday night at Mahardee, near the castle of Seijar, on the Orontes, north-west of Hamath; and on Wednesday took a south-west course to the foot of the Nusairiyeh mountain range, then ascended a rocky precipitous steep, several hundred feet in height, through tangled forests of oak, to the summit of the range near 'Ain esh Shems, or Fountain of the Sun. Farther to the west we rode down a narrow valley to 'Ain ez Zahib, or Gold Fountain, and then turning southward over a high rounded ridge, came suddenly in sight of the green secluded vale in the midst of which stand in weird solitude the ruins of " Husn Suleiman." The ruin is of unknown origin and of great antiquity. Like Ba'albek, it is of three styles of architecture, the colossal Phoenician, the Greek, and that of the Crusaders. There are two quadrangular courts a short distance from each other and quite distinct. The southern or larger one is a rectangle of four hundred and fifty feet long by two hundred and eighty feet wide, with a wall formerly forty feet in height. In the centre of each side is a great portal ten feet wide, twenty feet high, and eight feet thick. On the soffit of the east and west portals is an immense eagle with a caduceus in his talons and a retreating Ganymede on either side. The work resembles that at Ba'albek, but is far less elaborate. We spent six hours in sketching the ruins, and the engravings from these hasty sketches (in the Second Statement of the American Palestine Exploration Society) were the first pictures of the ruins published in Europe and America. The lintel over the eastern gate is a monolith twenty-one feet long, ten feet wide, and five feet high. It is chastely carved with a cornice of dice and flowers, with a king's head in the centre. On each end is a winged image in high relief, draped from the waist down, supporting the upper portion of the cornice on his shoulders, the arms being uplifted. At the bottom of the cornice is a Greek inscription, which reads somewhat thus : " Theobaitus possessed it. Servants of his household built it in the 682nd year." The cornice of the western portal has alternate dice, flowers, and grotesque faces in relief. The lintel of the east gate alone remains perfect; the western is broken in two pieces, the northern in three, and the southern has fallen. Inside the northern portal, on a tablet six feet by three, is an inscription in Greek and Latin. The Latin inscription has been translated by Dr. Ward. It states that the Emperor Valerianus and his son Gallienus and grandson Saloninus intrusted the province of Asia to Marcus Aurelius and others, &c, commanding them to see that the distant kingdoms ovei against the turbulent Parthians remain to them intact. The date is between 253 a.d. an 259 a.d., but the inscription is evidently of far later date than the building, and was no improbably cut in a tablet from which an older inscription had been effaced.