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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 433
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 433. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/494.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 433. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/494

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 433, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/494.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 433
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_460.jpg
Transcript ^^^MH^H THEBES. 433 The memorial chapels belonging to these tombs were built in the plain between the mountains and the Nile. The temple of Kurnah is a cenotaph erected by Seti L to the memory of his father, Rameses I.; the tombs of both are in the Valley of the Kings, and that of Seti, generally known as Belzoni's from the name of its discoverer, is the most famous of all these tombs, not only for its length (which measures four hundred and sevent) feel from the entrance to the fallen rock which now blocks up the end), but for the beauty and extent wall sculptures, now unhappily greatly defaced by exposure and vandalism. The alaba sarcophagus which Belzoni found here is now in the Soane Museum; but Sel discovered among the mummies in the pit at Deyr El-Bahry, and is in the bulak Museum, side- by side with the other great Theban monarchs. The next temple was famous in classical tin as the "Tomb of Ozymandias" or "of Memnon," but it is really the memorial chapel erected by Rameses the Great to his own glory, and therefore with better reason called tin- Rameseum. Of this splendid monument, which once had the full array of temple ornament its two noble gateways, its open court surrounded by a cloister supported by caryatid columns, leading to a hall of many columns, where the heavy stone roofing slabs lent a religious shade to the covered sanctuary beyond—little remains. The lofty gateways are half destroyed, most of the < Isiride cloister has disappeared ; but the long central vista of tall calyx-topped columns, and the side- aisles of lower lotus bud capitals, representing the well-proportioned and well spared •• ball assembly," are enough to show that the Rameseum must have been one of the m< of all the monuments of Egypt. As we stand in the shadow of the mighty columns, on whit h the successors of the Pharaohs have here and there painted the figure "I a < In i begin to realise the majesty of the Theban sanctuary and the magnificence of the king who could rear such a temple to his praise. There on the pylons are the spectacles oi his triumpl above all the supreme scene where, deserted by his body-guard and surrounded by the enemy, Rameses throws himself alone into the thick of the fray, with his single arm deals death around him, kills with his own hand the chief of the Khetas, crushes the flying foe under his chariot wheels; and, when his officers crowd before him with servile felicitations, denoui them for their cowardice, as the proud inscription runs: "The princes and captains did not join hands with me in fight; by myself have I done battle; I have put to flight thou sands of nations, and I was all alone!" The great conqueror was never wearied of recalling this deed of prowess; we see it twice in the Rameseum, again at Luxor, at Karnak, at Abu-Simbel; and close beside the sculptured record of his courage, on the second pylon of the Rameseum, lie the shattered fragments of the statue of Rameses himself, "the most gigantic figure that the Egyptians ever carved out of a single block of granite." This huge colossus once measured fifty-seven feet in height and weighed nearly twelve hundred tons ; but now it lies strewn upon the earth, broken, by what superhuman power we cannot guess, into a hundred pieces (see page 435'- Shelley's fine de the face, quoted beneath the cut, is almost as imaginative as his interpretation of th glyphic inscription.