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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 429
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 429. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/490.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 429. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/490

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 429, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/490.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 429
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_456.jpg
Transcript ■»- THEBES. 429 court of her fathers temple at Karnak, new and wonderful points of view ai I ai every step; and as we approach the level of the plain, and, leaving the platform v-vr El-Bahry, wander past the Assasif to the long colonnade which shows how greal a temple the Rameseum has once been-and with Kurnah on our left and Medinet Habu on our right, ride back through the scented bean-fields where the two colossi keep guard, till we reach the Nile again, with the temples and minarets of Luxor rising opposite in picturesque confusion we shall say with a Hebrew poet that no city could be "better than the city of Anion, that was enthroned among the streams, that had the waters round about her. whose rampart the Nile and her wall the river-sea " (Nahum iii. 8). The natural beauty of Thebes is not, however, in the eyes of most people, its chief title to admiration. Its girdle of hills encloses not only one of Nature's masterpi it BOmi the most marvellous achievements of human genius, skill, and perseverance. I here are n than twenty temples at Thebes—as many, that is to say, as all the rest of the surviving temples of Egypt put together—and in variety of design, grandeur of scale, and richness of decoration, and also, unhappily, in the ruthlessness of their ruin, they have no rivals. Many will pn for perfection of plan and comparative preservation, such exquisite examples of Ptolemaic art as the temples of Edfu and Dendarah; the design and the matchless sculptun enthral the admiration of others; while, for a bold and captivating realism in the wall paintil combined with an almost incredible massiveness in the masonry, the buildings of the Mempl empire stand without peer. But Thebes has something of all these, .md something more It has the massiveness of Memphis applied to columns and roofs and colossi, instead <>l square blocks of stone; it has graphic wall-sculptures, less natural and vivid, no doubt, than Sakkarah. and without the extraordinary, almost Greek, purity of Abydos, but still vigorous ami .on and representing, moreover, not merely a man's domestic life and country pursuits, Km the victories of the greatest kings of antiquity and the erection of the most magnificent "i ancient monuments, the works and wars of conquerors instead of the sports and business "I country magnates. And all this is found at Thebes in such abundance ami variety, on such an immense scale, in such endless forms and repetitions, that the mind fails to grasp the outline in the lavishness of detail, and appalled at the number and vastness of the fra ol I hebes, abandons the thoughts of analysis or comparison, and by acclamation accepts 'No Anion, enthroned among the streams " of its canals, as, after Memphis, the chief of the monumental sites of Egypt. Yet what we now see of Thebes, the monster ruins that cover so immense a spa represent but a fraction of what Thebes once has been. Even of the temples, not one- is e nearly entire. Karnak is a heap of ruins, fallen columns, broken obelisks, walls and r thrown down; Luxor is half buried and in part destroyed; Kurnah is in terrible the greater part of the Rameseum has disappeared; the temple of Amenoph has entire] bed, except its two colossal sentinels; Medinet Habu has suffered partial martyrdom at th< oi the Copts, who built a village over it; and how many other templet, of which we know 116