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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 421
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 421. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/482.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 421. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/482

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 421, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/482.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 421
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_448.jpg
Transcript I MEMPHIS. •l-i left, at the foot of the mountain—a wilderness of little white cupolas with here and then tree. Broad spaces of shade sleep under the spreading sycamores by the road side : a hawk circles overhead; and Siout, bathed in the splendour of the morning sun, looks as fair) 1.1, ever. * These tombs, and many others in various parts of Egypt, were appropriated by anchor, of the Christian Church ; and there is a yet sacreder association with them, if we like to bell the legend that makes Asyut, or Lycopolis as the Greeks called it, thr place where the I I Family sojourned during their exile in Egypt. Similar traditions are unfortunately common to meet with general acceptance ; and in this case thr likelihood is farther weakened by the improbability that the Holy Family, if they had once settled at Asyut. would ever have deserted it. Another large town was Girgeh, but it is now fallen into decay. Each year the river encroaches upon it; the banks are eaten away deeper at each inundation, the houses fall in. and Girgeh is disappearing into the Nile. Suhag, with its sugar-mills, takes its place ; hut Gi still a beautiful spot, faced by a noble cliff in the Arabian hills; and its population, lar composed of Copts—for Girgeh was a Christian settlement named after St I do a fair trade in dyeing and gold work. Like Asyut, Girgeh has its monumental background, but ii is much farther awaj .md infinitely more important; for twelve miles west of the town of St. George lie the ruins of Abydos, the site of Thinis, and the burial-place of Osiris. The better waj bo go to Abydos, however, is from Bellianeh, a good-sized village with a curious under pround ( optic church, but little else that is noteworthy. Passing between the clean-looking well-built houses with their quaint pigeon-battlements, crossing some dry canals, and traversing a lovel] "I palms, we emerge upon the most fertile tract in Egypt. For six miles we ride through wa\ ing bai wheat, and bean fields; far as the sight can reach on either side stretches the wide i of green. Slingers are standing here and there, armed with their fibre sling ird the precious grain from the birds that hover above. A long string of camels winds slowl) al< the narrow footpaths that intersect the cornfields, and a grey-bearded Aral) of the outlying village jogs into town upon his ass. This granary of Egypt is one of the most perfect sights in the land. Visiting Abydos, as the traveller generally does, on the return voyage, the vivid green of this six miles' ride offers a refreshing restful contrast to the eye which has 1 blinking for weeks at burning yellow sand and limestone ; and to him who ]. en the I I Island where Osiris is fabled to sleep, the home of the older legend which tells how the head of the god was buried at Abydos is doubly interesting. Historically, ho* should be the first monumental sight visited after Memphis and the Pyramids. Indeed, the oldesl city of Egypt, Thinis or This, once stood here, whence Menes, the first of the long line of Egyptian kings, migrated to found Memphis. Crude brick remains are all that ran now be seen of Thinis; and Abydos, its successor, belongs to post-Memphite times, and lorn ting prelude ♦ Amelia Ii. Kd wards, " One Thousand Mil.-, ii)> Ik. Nile." 116