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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 417
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 417. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/478.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 417. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/478

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 417, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/478.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 417
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_444.jpg
Transcript MEMPHIS. Egyptian life and manners is derived. Those at Beny Hasan, excavated by a Me family of the time of the Twelfth Dynasty, are the most famous; but and abounds in tombs which present some point of interest or importan The western bank presents a complete contrast. Here the mountains trend awa) some distance, and between them and the river spread the famous corn-fields of the N valley, the villages in which the fellahin live, sometimes a laige town, and everywb !ufs (see page 425) and sakiyehs—machines for raising water for irrigating the higher lands page 395)' cattle bathing in the cool river, women with water-pots on their heads, and the other usual commonplaces of Egyptian scenery. If one feature is more peculiar than anoth the inevitable pigeon-tower, with earthen pots for a battlement, which greets kb village and town all up the Nile voyage (see page 419). Tn wanting in ti except sparse clumps of palms and stunted acacias and tamarisks, which form :d to .1 village scene. These villages are of two kinds. "Some are built on high mounds, the to mulation for the most part of millenniums of crude brick buildings, Seme, on the Other hand, are flat, but protected from the inundations very imperfectly by thickly butn wide moat, which is full of water in October, a fetid marsh in 1 December, and drj in j —a place of bad smells and air thickened with mist and mosquitoes, Every h ;i house has fallen over the wall and an avalanche of crude bricks is bein melted into the moat I I the children bask, naked, except for a thick incrustation of flies, and the dogs Bleep amon them As you walk round the village to find an entrance you come, if it is on a mound, to what !• like a newly extemporised path, leading up at an angle so steep that your hands often tow h tin- ground as you climb. If there is no such mound, you probably enter without an\ >aaU- he tun n two high mud walls, and find yourselves presently in the public places a square ol ; fifty feet each way, with ruined seats or divans round three sides, and 1 sometimes a mere hut, at the other. Some villages have beautiful greens of mall grass, interspersed with palms, surrounding them; but the tendency of taxation within the last few years has been to cause these pleasant places to be desolated. A shrykh's tomb, with white-washed mud dome, is usually to be seen glimmering through the shade and near it tl is often a well with a very primitive wheel made of sticks and cords. I (ere the elder village sit and smoke, and the women gossip as they fill their great pitchers. " The houses in these villages are one-storeyed, built of unbaked Nile mud, without u ind< and only a few small holes for light. On them or near by them is a sort of battl edifice which is devoted to the pigeons that infest every Nile villa. There are all stages of these hamlets, from the cluster of miserable hovels kneaded up by the felllh or Nile pea covered with reeds or mats, and surrounded by a mud wall incl. 1 which holds the live stock, the tub-like structures which serve as store-room and pantry, to the W( village, With its mosque and white-washed minaret, and the country town with its substantial dwellings, its market, and its street."* * Loftie, M RSdC in «•■ 259—-"