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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 404
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 404. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/465.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 404. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/465

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 404, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/465.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 404
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_431.jpg
Transcript 4o4 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. causeth thee to flow, we implore God, the One, the Mighty, to make thee flow.' 'Amr did as he was commanded, and the Nile, we are told, rose sixteen cubits in the following night." * The evening before the cutting of the dam the Nile about Rodah becomes very gay and animated. Boats of all kinds and sizes bring visitors to witness the ceremony, and a great state barge, carrying cannon and ornamented with lanterns and decorations, sails with much pomp from Bulak, and moors to the island opposite the entrance of the canal. The land is as fully peopled as the water ; crowds gather on the mainland near Masr E1-'Atikah and on Rodah, and tents are pitched for their shelter and refreshment. A Cairo crowd easily amuses itself; coffee and pipes will generally content it, and the mere prospect of something going to be done is enough to make it very happy. All that night nobody sleeps. If he wished to, the constant firing of guns from the big barge, the beating of drums on the other boats, the discharge of rockets, and general babel of noises would render the desire abortive. But no one harbours so foolish a wish : the mere sight of the Nile that night is a scene out of fairyland. Boats gaily decked and covered with coloured lamps pass to and fro, their crews merrily dinning away at the tar and darabukkeh ; every now and then a rocket flies up against the quiet stars, which look down in surprise at the disturbance mere sublunaries are making, and the whole air is alive with sounds and sights of gaiety and innocent frolic. It is like Venice in the old carnival time, only the voices and dresses are changed, and we cannot help feeling that, like the carnival, this ceremony belongs to an older state of things and an older religion. As we gaze upon the crowd we feel dimly that the priest of I sis ought to be there. Early next morning the workmen are busy cutting away the dam, till only the thickness of a foot is left. Soon after sunrise the officials begin to appear : the Governor of Cairo rides up, the Kady reads a formal document, a boat bearing another officer is pushed through the mud wall, purses of gold are flung about, and the Nile is soon flowing rapidly between the banks of the Khalig, and rejoicing the hearts of the Cairenes who dwell beside it (see page 394). Reserve and decency are thrown to the winds, and a mania for bathing seizes the population. The only monument of any interest at Masr El-Atikah (all that remains of Fustat, the first Muslim capital of Egypt), if we except some curious Coptic churches—built partly in the bastions of the old Roman fortress of Babylon, of which considerable remains can be traced— and some quaint old byways and alleys (see page 401), is the (oft-times rebuilt) mosque of 'Amr, the Arab conqueror. Here, in 1808, when the river seemed to be about to fall at the time when it ought to have risen, the chiefs of all denominations, Muslim ulema, Coptic clergy, Jewish rabbis, all assembled together for united prayer, and continued entreating until the river rose in the usual degree. Amid the general ruin and desolation of Fustat, which was almost wholly destroyed in 1168 by a fire which continued to burn for fifty-four days, and left little but the immense mounds we see around, the mosque of 'Amr still survives, with its line colonnades of strangely incongruous pillars, as a monument, albeit a hybrid one, ol the Mohammadan conquest. When it falls, they say, Islam will cease to be. * " The Modern Egyptians," chap. xxvi.