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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 402
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 402. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/463.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 402. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/463

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 402, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/463.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 402
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_429.jpg
Transcript 402 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. given abundance." " The canals flow—and the vessels are afloat—and the hoarder of grain has failed—by permission of the Mighty, the Requiter," &c, interrupted at each clause by the refrain of the boys, "Ofa-llah!" " God hath given abundance." " This is an annual custom," continues the crier. "God hath given abundance," repeat the boys. "And may you live to' every year!" "God hath given abundance!" "And if the hoarder of grain wish for a scarcity—" "God hath given abundance! " " May God visit him with blindness and affliction ere he dies!" "God hath given abundance!" "This generous person" (here the crier personally addresses himself to the master of the house before which he is standing) " loveth the generous- an admirable palace is built for him (in Paradise)—and its columns are incomparable jewels — instead of palm-sticks and timber—and it has a thousand windows that open— and before every window is Selsebil (the fountain of the blest)—Paradise is the abode of the generous and hell is the abode of the niggardly." In every pause the boys ejaculate, " God hath given abundance !" " May God not cause me to stop before the door of an avaricious woman, nor of an avaricious man," continues the crier sarcastically--■" nor of one who measures the water in the jar—nor who counts the bread while it is yet dough—and if a cake be wanting orders a fast- nor who shuts up the cats at supper time- nor who drives away the dogs upon the wall." "God hath given abundance!" echo the boys. "The world is brightened, and the damsels have adorned themselves—and the old women tumble about and the married man hath added to his wife eight others—and the bachelor hath married eighteen!" " God hath given abundance !" By this time somebody, afraid of his scorn of avarice, or cajoled by his flatteries and humour, has given a copper or two to the crier, who then moves on to the next house. The adornment of the damsels and the excitement of the old women and the extravagances of bachelors and married men find their crowning point in the festivities of cutting the dam of the canal, which takes place on the following day. " The dam," says Mr. Lane, "is constructed before or soon after the commencement of the Nile's increase. The Khalig, or canal, at the distance of about four hundred feet within its entrance, is crossed by an old stone bridge of one arch. About sixty feet in front of this bridge is the dam, which is of earth, very broad at the bottom, and diminishing in breadth towards the top, which is flat, and about three yards broad. The top of the dam rises to a height of about twenty-two or twenty-three feet above the level of the Nile when at the lowest, but not so high above the bed of the canal, for this is several feet above the low-water mark of the river, and consequently dry for some months when the water is low. The banks of the canal are a few feet higher than the top of the dam. Nearly the same distance in front of the dam that the latter is distant from the bridge is raised a round pillar of earth, diminishing towards the top in the form of a truncated cone, not quite so high the dam. This is called the ariLseh, or 'bride.' I'pon its flat top, and on that of the dam, a little maize or millet is commonly sown. The 'aruseh' is always washed clown by the rising tide before the river has attained to its summit, and generally more than a week or a fortnight before the dam is cut.