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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 400
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 400. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/461.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 400. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/461

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 400, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/461.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 400
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_427.jpg
Transcript 4oo PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. though it is a favourite subject for Cairene poets, and the inhabitants love to smoke their pipes and enjoy their " keyf" or siesta in the houses and terraces overlooking it, and drowsily listen to the murmur of the water-wheel (see page 395)— " Where bright Khaleega, like a spotted snake, Past meads and gardens trails her glittering coil "— it is only pretty during four months when the Nile fills it, while for the rest of the year " bright Khaleega" is a gutter of mud and a home for noisome smells. The people, however, are so fond of this unwholesome drain that no ruler dares risk his popularity by converting it into a street, though that is, undoubtedly, its proper destiny. In the gardens which fringe the Khalig the fair inhabitants of the harim enjoy the fragrance and tints of the rose and oleander and the other favourites of Cairene horticulture unseen by the profane eye of man. It is true the ladies of Egypt do not take much interest in their flowers ; the gardeners make formal bouquets for them, which they languidly admire, but they never dream of tending or even plucking the flowers themselves. Nevertheless, they enjoy " smelling the air," as they call it, amid the irregular parterres of Cairene horticulture ; and if we are to believe Beha-ed-din Zuheyr, an Egyptian poet of the thirteenth century, who wrote some charming verse which our lamented E. H. Palmer (who deserved so well of students of Palestine and Arabia) turned into no less charming English, these gardens of Cairo were once, and may still remain, delightful places for lovers' meetings. The garden he described looked on the Nile, but in other respects the picture applies to many of the pleasure-grounds in the heart of the city :— •' I took my pleasure in a garden bright— Ah ! that our happiest hours so quickly pass ; That time should be so rapid in its flight— Therein my soul accomplished her delight, And life was fresher than the green young grass. There raindrops trickle through the warm, still air, The cloud-born firstlings of the summer skies; Full oft I stroll in early morning there, When, like a pearl upon a bosom fair, The glistening dewdrop on the sapling lies. There the young flowerets with sweet perfume blow; There feathery palms their pendant clusters hold, Like foxes' bushes waving to and fro ; There every evening comes the after-glow, Tipping the leaflets with its liquid gold. Beside that garden flowed the placid Nile. Oft have I steered my dahabiyeh there ; Oft have I landed to repose awhile, And bask and revel in the sunny smile Of her whose presence made the place so fair." West of the Tfilun the canal makes a sharp angle, and then, resuming its south-westerly direction, enters the Nile close to Masr El-'Atikah,or, as Europeans call it, " Old Cairo." 1 he entrance of the canal (Fum El-Khalig) is opposite the island of Rodah, where is the famous Nilometer, or well for measuring the height of the inundation. Until the river has risen to the height of sixteen cubits in the Nilometer, an old law enacts that no land-tax can be levied. The Government, however, of course take care to publish a falsified measurement before the due