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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 396
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 396. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/457.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 396. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/457

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 396, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/457.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 396
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_423.jpg
Transcript 396 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. position, expelled the Turkish governor, Khurshid, from the Citadel. The fortress was constructed of massive stones brought from the third and smaller pyramids of Gizeh, and its vaulted gateways, machicolated battlements, and round towers present an almost Norman aspect. The principal building inside is Mohammad 'Aly's great mosque, with its over-slender minarets> cruet-stand of domes (see page 390), and gaudy Turkish decoration. The alabaster columns that procure it the name of " the Alabaster Mosque" were quarried near Beny Suweyf, but many of them were stolen by 'Abbas Pasha for his palace, and replaced by wood. All Cairene building subsists on the principle of robbery. The Ptolemies stole the pillars of the Pharaohs; the Arabs used the materials of the Greeks and Romans ; the Turks steal from most of their predecessors with their usual indiscriminating brigandage. The Citadel is an extraordinary medley of all styles and periods. Hieroglyphic blocks jostle Turkish lath-and-plaster; the eagle of Saladin looks down upon the flimsy ornaments of Isma'il. The deep well called, after Saladin (whose name was also Yusuf, or Joseph), Joseph's Well, but believed by the Arabs to have been the identical pit into which Joseph, son of Jacob, was cast by his envious brethren, is an enlargement of an ancient shaft. Though very deep —nearly three hundred feet—its slow supply, raised by oxen, has been superseded by the modern steam pumps. The mosque of En-Nasir Mohammad, hard by, is a partly ruined building, despoiled of many of its adornments, but presenting much that is noteworthy in the history of Arab art. But the Citadel is not worth seeing for itself so much as for the view (page 387 gives but a portion of it) which spreads before the eye as one stands at sunset on its battlemented wall. Below lies the city with its countless domes and minarets—Sultan Hasan in the foreground— its wilderness of irregular tumble-down yellow and white flat-roofed houses, interspersed with many a garden and the dark foliage of the sycamores; beyond, a fringe of palms and a streak of silver show where the broad Nile rolls sleepily on between its brown banks. To the right, the huge dome and handsome minarets of El-Muayyad stand out prominently from among their fellows; beyond these the minarets of the Nahhasin; and at the end the two queer-shaped mebkharehs of El-Hakim. To the left is the enormous court of Ibn-Tulun's mosque, and its strange minaret then the billowy mounds of Fustat; and in the distance, against the ridge that terminates the Libyan desert, in the carmine glory of the setting sun, stand the everlasting Pyramids, " like the boundary-marks of the mighty waste, the Egyptian land of shades." Still farther to the left, the aqueduct, which has brought water to the Citadel for nearly four centuries, stretches away to the Nile; and behind us is the picturesque cluster of the ruined " Tombs of the Memluks," or cemetery of El Karafeh (see pages 390, 391, and 392), with their attendant city, not only of tombs, but of numerous houses for the reception of families who pay annual visits to the graves of their relatives, and celebrate the occasion by acts of charity and recitations of the entire Koran. Looking over the Memluk minarets, we can see the dim outlines of the Pyramids of Dahshur and Abusir and the well-known form of the Step Pyramid of Sakkarah ; and as the glow of sunset fades away, the evening clouds gather in the west, and the desert beyond takes up their shades of grey and blue, like a vast mid-African ocean.