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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 389
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 389. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/450.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 389. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/450

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 389, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/450.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 389
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_416.jpg
Transcript • CAIRO. together with part of his kaftan (or coat), which when wrapped round the body is believed to be a cure for ague. Probably the clothes of this charitable Muslim prince are as worthy to work miracles in healing as the wall of Knock chapel or the image of Our Lady of Lourdes. Farther along the High Street, at the corner of the Musky, is the mosque and medreseh of El-Ashraf Barsabay, who also built a mosque in the Eastern Cemetery of Kait Bay (see page 380); and a little beyond, in the Ghuriyeh, are the two mosques of El-Ghury, the last of the Memluk sultans; that on the left hand (the tomb-mosque) is being restored with unusual skill, while that on the right, so far untouched, is a cruciform building with richly coloured ceilings and fine cornices. Farther still, with its minarets rising from the strange old gatewaj called the Bab Zuweyleh, is the mosque of El-Muayyad, also a Memluk, with a fine bronze o-atc which once belonged to the mosque of another prince of the same dynasty, Sultan Hasan. A vie* of the eastern transept of the latter magnificent mosque, which stands in the Rumeyleh in front of the Citadel, and is admitted to be the stateliest monument of Arab art in Egypt, is given in the woodcut on page 381, where the large canopied fountain for ablution before prayers is in the foreground, with the smaller fountain for the use of Turks at the right; while at the back can be seen the sanctuary, with its niche, pulpit, and reading platform, and the doors on either side which lead to the founder's tomb. If instead of proceeding to the Citadel wo turn up tin prolongation of the Musky towards the eastern wall, we shall find on tho loft the peculiarly sacred and unsightly mosque of the Hasaneyn, where the severed head of the martyred Hoseyn, the hero of the Persian Passion Play, is believed to be buried; while on the other side is the Azhar, the university mosque of Cairo—indeed the university of the Mohammadan world, whose ten thousand students come from India and the west coast of Africa, and even more remote regions, to learn Koranic exegesis and the decisions of the three hundred learned ulema who teach them without payment. The Azhar was built by the I uimy khalif Eb'Aziz in the tenth century, but has been several times restored or added to nil little architectural beauty remains in it. There is, however, one beautiful arcade leading up to the mihrab in the eastern colonnade, and some inscriptional friezes, which clearly date back to the Fitimy period. Continuing our walk through the Bab El-Ghureyyib, we shall find, beyond the huge mounds of rubbish outside the city, a collection of tomb-mosques, forming the cemetery known to natives as that of Kait Bay, but to Europeans as "the Tombs of the KhalifsA The tombs, however, are not those of khalifs, but of that dynasty of Memluk sultans who built most of the mosques within the city. The tomb-mosque of Kait Bay (see page 386), with its exquisite fawn-coloured limestone dome and graceful minaret, deservedly gives its name to this Eastern Cemetery; but the tomb-mosque of Barkuk (see page 383), in the same vicinity, is scarcely less beautiful. Under one of its two noble domes the founder of the house of Circassian Memluks sleeps after his career of conquest, the other covers the bones of his family, while his son and successor rests hard by. The mosque of Barkuk is of the colonnade form ; the sanctuary on the east is distinguished by a deeper rank of columns, and the pulpit, carved out of tine liiiKStone, i>1 111