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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 388
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 388. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/449.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 388. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/449

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 388, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/449.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 388
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_415.jpg
Transcript 388 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. these subtle tints appeared merely washed-out colours that ought to be revived; and the arrival of visitors for the extravagant festivities that celebrated the opening of the Suez Canal presented an occasion for furbishing up the faded monuments of Cairo which could not be passed over. So the viceregal paintpot was put into requisition, and the subdued colours of the mosque facades were " daubed with vulgar ruddle and glaring yellow " by the common house-painter, till his vile "jack-pudding pattern of stripes," as Ebers indignantly exclaims, " disgraces the noble monuments " upon which the skilful architects of the Middle Ages bestowed so much thought and taste. The Turks can build nothing themselves but tawdry palaces and gaudy, tasteless, over-ornamented mosques; and the edifices they do set up are so insecurely built that they will infallibly come down before long amid the plaudits of a critical posterity. But if they cannot create, they can spoil ; and it is hard to know which to anathematise more, their neglect or their restoration of the art monuments of Cairo. The Memluks, who built most of the mosques, were probably as bad a set of rulers as any Turkish sultans or khedives ; many of them indeed were of Turkish, though not of Ottoman, blood. But at least they had a not ignoble ambition to adorn their capital with beautiful buildings, and if personal vanity entered into their motives it was a vanity which excuses itself by its effects. En-Nasir, one of the best of the Memluk kings, spent eight thousand pieces of gold a day on building, and this when the forced labour which reared all the monuments of Egypt, from the Pyramids to Port Sa'id, struck out the item of wages! More than thirty mosques, besides mausoleums and other works, sprang up in his reign. Yet his own mosque is one of the least of its genus, and its most salient feature, the marble portal, is not Arab at all, but was subsequently brought by another sultan as a war trophy from Acre (refer to page 91). The mosque and hospital, called the Maristan of Kalaun, next to it, is a much more interesting structure. It was built at the end of the thirteenth century for the purpose of a hospital, wherein rich and poor were gratuitously treated and fed. There were wards for every different disease that was known, and a hall where the chief doctor delivered his lectures. In the religious part of the building fifty salaried readers of the Koran publicly taught the Mohammadan religion, and a librarian with five assistants superintended a fine collection of medical, legal, theological, and grammatical books. Four lecture-rooms were allotted to teachers of the four orthodox sects of Islam, and sixty orphans were gratuitously maintained and educated in a state-supported school. This noble institution was till lately used as a lunatic asylum, but now it is in ruins. Tinkers batter their pans where surgeons formerly operated ; coppersmiths are soldering pots where once the learned expounded the law ; and beyond the richly decorated tomb, a singularly noble structure, and a plainer mosque opposite it, little is preserved of the famous Maristan. Women resort to the tomb-mosque to pray for male offspring, and mothers take their infants thither to have their " tongues loosed," which is effectually accomplished by squeezing lemon juice upon the red stone and making the unhappy babies lick it, with the immediate result of piercing screams and the perfect satisfaction of the mothers. People who suffer from headaches also go to touch the turban of Kalaun, a piece of which is preserved,