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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 382
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 382. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/443.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 382. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/443

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 382, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/443.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 382
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_409.jpg
Transcript 382 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. which nobody can look, and to closely veil the windows, especially the few that must look into the street, with lattice blinds, which admit a subdued light and sufficient air, and permit an outlook without allowing the outside world to see through the delicately carved screen. The wooden screens and secluded court are necessary to fulfil the requirements of the Mohammadan system of separating the sexes. Many private houses stand in quiet culs-de-sac, closed at the single entrance by a gate; but others are in frequented thoroughfares, and their ground-floors abutting on the street are often let out in shops which have no communication with the interior of the houses. Shops in Cairo occupy little space and encroach very inconsiderably upon the houses beneath which they are situated (see page 371). A recess eight feet high and six broad, with shelves for the wares, and a large stone seat in front for the tradesman and his customers to sit upon and discuss a quiet pipe (or in these degenerate days an unsatisfying cigarette) over their bargaining, forms all that the average Cairene requires in the way of a shop. When the day's work is over, or if he feels inclined to go to the mosque or for a chat with a congenial acquaintance, the shopkeeper lets down the shutter that is hinged above his recess, locks it in a perfunctory manner, and departs with an easy mind. If anybody wants to buy anything while he is absent, u God is with the patient," or " Haste comes from the devil," succinctly expresses his view of the interruption. A number of these little recesses on either side of the street make up a Suk, or bazaar, over which picturesque awnings of more or less tattered and disreputable appearance are sometimes stretched to shade the customers. These various streets and bazaars used formerly to be closed by gates at night, but these have long been abolished. Sometimes they enclose a large building of a couple of stories, called a Khan or Wekaleh, entirely devoted to merchants and merchandise, and in several instances, like that of the noble Wekaleh of Kait Bay beside the Azhar, these buildings have some pretensions to beauty. In Cairo the usual oriental plan prevails of arranging the shops according to their trades or the place whence their wares come ; and if the purchaser wishes to buy several articles of different kinds he may have to go some distance. After buying boots, say, in one shop, he will pass several hundred other cobblers, and whole streets of other trades, before he arrives at the jeweller or carpet-seller he is seeking. Most of these classified streets, devoted to distinct trades, cluster round the great thoroughfares that form the cross upon the ensign—to retain our simile. The Jemaliyeh, where the wholesale dealers display the products of the Red Sea trade, and the great Khan El-Khalily, a notable place for silks and carpets, are both in the dexter chief, the north-east corner of our flag. Below the horizontal line formed by the Suk En-Nahhasin, where tinned and copper wares abound side by side with pipe-sticks, amber, and the smoker's paraphernalia in general, is the Marghush, or cotton market; nearer the Musky, the crooked intricate Seven Dials of the silversmiths and jewellers; and farther west the quarters of the Jews, odoriferous as usual. On the southern side of the Musky, or rather of its eastern prolongation, are the shops of the booksellers, who are learned men, and enjoy the peculiar advantage of being tied down by no fixed published price for their books ; and the market for goods from the Sudan—leopard skins, Nubian weapons, gums, ostrich eggs, feathers, and