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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 378
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 378. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/439.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 378. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/439

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 378, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/439.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 378
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_405.jpg
Transcript 378 PICTURESQUE PALESTLNE. tufy, he built the Citadel on a spur of Mount Mukattam, and enlarged the Fatimy walls so as to include his new fortress in their circuit, and also a small suburb to the north of the original wall of El-Kahirah. The city had now expanded from the square mile or less of the old Fatimy enclosure to the size of the Cairo of to-day, excluding the modern quarter of the southwest,—that is, about three miles long and a mile to a mile and a half wide. Most of these changes can be traced in the present city. A small part of El-Fustat remains under the name of Masr El-'Atikah, separated from the city by the great mounds of rubbish which indicate vanished suburbs. El-Katai' was partly burnt and partly neglected, and little of it remains but the mosque of its founder, Ahmad Ibn-Tulun, which, with the site of the old suburb, was included within the circuit of Saladin's walls. Of El-Kahirah the whole growth can readily be traced. The oldest wall still stands on the north side, though the magnificent gateways of the Bab En-Nasr, or "Gate of Victory," with its mighty square towers and fine vaulting within, and the Bab El-Futuh, or " Gate of Conquests," flanked with massive round towers, are not quite on their original sites, but were removed to enclose the ruined mosque and mebkharehs of El-Hakim, the mad founder of the Druses. The cornice and frieze, adorned with fine Kufic inscriptions, which run along the face of the gateway and the faces and inner sides of the two towers, half-way from the ground, no less than its massive and clean-cut masonry, distinguish the Bab En-Nasr among Arab monuments (see page 370). The second wTall is still where it was on the eastern boundary of the city, and its other sides may be traced by the names of demolished gates, as the Bab El-Bahr, the Bab El-Luk, and the Bab El-Khalak; and the Bab Zuweyleh, also called Bab El-Mutawelly, still standing in the heart of the city, is one of the most striking monuments of Cairo, though its walls and inscriptions are daubed over with plaster, and its towers were lowered to make room for the minarets of the adjoining mosque of El-Muayyad. This second wall, thus mapped out, must have run from near the present bridge over the Isma'iliyeh Canal, along the western side of the Ezbekiyeh (where the wall was standing in 1842), to near the Abdin Palace, where it turned up to the Bab Zuweyleh, and was prolonged to the eastern wall. Since it was built the Nile has considerably changed its course, and now runs much farther to the westward. Saladin's wall was a restoration of this in part, but his addition (begun in 1170) round the citadel is in full preservation, like the fortress itself, though the continuation round the site of El-Katai' on the south is demolished. The names of the gates, however, show that the limits of the present city on the south are nearly what they were in Saladin's day, and this wall must have run from the citadel to near the mosque of Ibn-Tulun, enclosed it, and turned north to meet the old wall near the Bab El-Luk. The limits of the modern additions are only too plain, but the " improvements " of the reigning dynasty happily do not extend to the old Fatimy quarter, and indeed scarcely affect Saladin's city except in prolongation and widening of the Musky, the opening of the broad " Boulevard Mohammad 'Aly " to the citadel, and the laying out of the Rumeylah and the spaces of Sultan Hasan and Kara Meydan in the usual European style. With these