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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 374
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 374. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/435.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 374. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/435

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 374, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/435.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 374
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_401.jpg
Transcript 374 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. luxuriant Delta over which the Nile yearly spreads its fertilizing waters; for at the point where the narrow valley begins to expand, like a green fan, towards the broad embouchure, stands Cairo, the jewel in its handle. The country we have just traversed is interesting for its Biblical associations; the reign of the shepherd kings who welcomed Israel, and the sojourn and toil and exodus of the chosen people, render the land of Goshen beyond all things memorable. Cairo, on the other hand, is modern and Mohammadan. Yet even so it has its significance to the student of the Bible; for here, at least until European inroads laid waste the Arabian city, could the life and modes of thought of the Semitic race be studied at their best; and a study of the mind of the Muslim not seldom proved the best key to the thoughts of the Hebrew. Cairo is not merely the largest city in Africa, it is the most perfect example the world can show of a Mohammadan capital. In spite of the " Haussmannizing " tendency of recent days, and the attempt to raise it to the questionable dignity of a bastard Paris, Cairo is still the ideal city of the Arabian Nights. We can still shut our eyes to the hotels and restaurants, the dusty grass-plots, and tawdry villa residences of the modern bricklayer's paradise, and turn away to wander in the labyrinth of narrow lanes which intersect the old parts of the city, just as they did in the days of the Memluk sultans. And as we thread the winding alleys, where a thin streak of sky marks the narrow space between the lattice-windows of the overhanging upper stories, and dive under a camel here, or retreat into a recess there, to escape what seems imminent death at the feet of the advancing and apparently impassable crowd of beasts of burden, camels, asses, and horses, laden or ridden, we may fancy ourselves in the gateway of 'Aly of Cairo, and in that stall round the corner we may perhaps hear the story of the wonderful adventures of the six brothers, from the immortal Barber himself; within the grated lattice over the way, the Three Royal Mendicants may at this moment be entertaining the Portress and her fair sisters with the history of their lives ; and if we wait till night we may see the good Harun Er-Rashid himself (though he did live in Baghdad) coming stealthily to the house in his midnight rambles, with Ja'far at his heels, and black Mesrur clearing the way. A few streets away from the European quarter it is easy to dream that we are acting a part in the veracious history of the Thousand and One Nights—which do, in fact, describe Cairo and its people and life as they were in the fifteenth century, and as, to a great degree, they are still. In its very dilapidation the city helps the illusion ; the typical Eastern houses falling to ruins, which no one thinks of repairing, are of course haunted by the 'Efrits and other mischievous Jinn, who keep away all God-fearing tenants. But if in its ruined houses, far more in what survives of its mediaeval monuments does Cairo transport one to the golden age of Arabian art and culture. Among its mosques and the fragments of its palaces are the noblest examples of Arabian architecture which can be seen in all the wide empire of Islam. Damascus and Baghdad, Delhi and Gaur, Seville and Cordova, possess elements of beauty that Cairo has not, and serve to complete the history of Arabian art; but to see that art in its perfection, uncorrupted by the mechanical detail of the Alhambra, free from the distorted outlines of India,