Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 344
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 344. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/404.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 344. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/404

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 344, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/404.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 344
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_370.jpg
Transcript 344 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. rock, there forming deep pools which invite one to bathe in their cool waters, reflecting areen ferns and mosses. Just where Wady Bugiyeh—" the valley through which water rushes with the sound of a trumpet "—flows in from the neighbouring pass of Nagb Hawa the vegetation is seen in its utmost abundance, and the ruins and gardens are most numerous. In the midst of the savage grandeur of such utter desolation these gardens smiling with vines, olives, apple and pear-trees, fig-trees, nebbuk, apricots, mulberry-trees, &c, &c, almost make one forgetful of the surrounding wilderness. The main defile is named Wady Emleisah, " The Slippery Valley," and the traveller is prepared for hard work amongst its smooth boulders polished by the running waters. Just below Wady Bugiyeh an old monastic path affords a little help. Two miles above this tributary there is a bifurcation, and the valley takes the name Wady T'lah,— (Taldh is the opposite to Salah, "righteous"—the inaccessible nature of the valley once made it a favourite resort of robber bands). The principal and fertile branch turning southward subdivides into many little valleys, which climb the slopes of Jebel Katarina to their sources; the other branch, a mile long, terminates in a steep nagb, with an immediate descent into Seil Leja, not far from the foot of Ras Sufsafeh. In this Wady T'lah are the remains of the convent of SS. Cosmas and Damian, and of the prison convent of St. John Climax. The central passage, Nagb Hawa, " Pass of the Wind," may be reckoned as being fifteen miles from the commencement of Wady Feiran. It can be traversed by very lightly laden or riding camels, but a large caravan must necessarily take the road by Wady es Sheikh. The pass commences near the head of Wady Solaf (some three thousand five hundred feet above the sea). A large cluster of ancient stone circles and nawamis is soon reached, called Matabb ed Deir el Gadim, " The Site of the Ancient Convent," and then the ascent begins. It is steep and difficult at first, for the old way paved with flags, passing in and out amongst tremendous boulders and blocks of granite detached from the heights above, has been partly destroyed by torrents. The defile varies in breadth from two hundred to three hundred yards, and is like a long straight passage, through which the winter storms from the north-west must rush with tremendous fury. It is a tedious two hours' journey, though only four miles direct from the foot of the nagb to the watershed—about one thousand five hundred and seventy feet above the head of Wady Solaf. After the watershed is crossed, there is a rapid descent and then another ascent through Wady Abu Seileh. Following the course of a feeble stream till the crest of the pass is gained (five thousand one hundred and forty-one feet above the sea), the entire plain of Er Rahah is seen stretched before us, and we are face to face with Ras Sufsafeh, two miles away, and the majestic pile of Jebel Musa. This mountain block, composed mainly of red or pink syenitic granite, has for the traveller coming from the north a direction south-east. Its length is rather more than two miles and its breadth a mile. Wady ed Deir, " The Convent Valley," sometimes called Wady es Sho'eib, " Jethro's Valley " (see steel plate), in which stands the Convent of St. Catherine, separates it on the north-east from Jebel ed Deir; while on the south-west a deep, narrow ravine, Wady Sh'reich, divides it from the subordinate ridge of Jebel Fera, which is itself cut off from the