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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 334
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 334. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/394.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 334. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/394

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 334, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/394.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 334
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_360.jpg
Transcript 334 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. followed Moses.* The movement of the pilgrim caravan on the yearly journey to Mecca is always a marvel, but this does not usually number more than a small fraction of the "armies" of the Israelites who came up out of Egypt. Men, women, and children— the old and infirm, the young and the sickly— all have to be reckoned in with this host. Then, too, the imagination must conjure up, not a country of vast rolling plains or steppes, but a mountainous district, full of narrow winding valleys with steep precipitous sides. There is a third point to be considered when the claims of the two mountains are beino- examined, viz., What is the capability of either for the encampment of the Israelites, and also for the giving of the Law, under the conditions of the Bible narrative ? It must be remembered that it was in the second month of the second year that the camp was broken up at Sinai (Numbers x. 11), and that then commenced the direct march to the Promised Land, which was destined to end so miserably in the punishment of the long years of wandering in the wilderness of the Tih. For such a prolonged halt, during which the ritual of worship and the orderly government of the people was laid down and adopted, a roomy camping-ground, it may be supposed, would be indispensable. This is found in the immediate neighbourhood of Jebel Musa, but not in the valleys of the Serbal district. The great plain of Er Rahah, in front of Jebel Musa, was carefully measured at the time of the Ordnance Survey by Captain Palmer, and his measurements proved that " the space extending from the base of the mountain (i.e. from the foot of the bluff Ras Sufsafeh) to the watershed or crest of the plain is large enough to have accommodated the entire host of the Israelites, estimated at two million souls, with an allowance of about a square yard for each individual." x^t the watershed the breadth is about nine hundred yards. From here to the foot of Ras Sufsafeh the distance is about one mile and a third, while the northern slope of the plain is about two-thirds of a mile in length. Apart, however, from the commodiousness of Er Rahah for an encampment, its gradual slope to Jebel Musa, and the grand view which is always had of the mountain rising at once out of the plain —not in gentle slopes, nor in steep gradations, but abrupt and precipitous — forces one to recognise the superior claim of the block of mountains which is bounded by Jebel Musa—the highest point—at its southern or south-eastern extremity, and by Ras Sufsafeh at its northern end, to be the scene of the giving of the Law. As to the narrative of Jethro's visit to Moses, in Exodus xviii, with its several references to the Mount of God, we may with reason suppose that it may not be in its proper historical position. The visit would not have been made until it was known that the Israelites had permanently encamped; and unless we argue that Jethro had been waiting in the neighbourhood for some time, it is not likely that he would move from Midian into the territory of the Amalekites before certain news had reached him of their defeat and enforced withdrawal from Feiran and the neighbouring valleys. The chapter is very complete in itself, and in no wise suffers from being removed to a position in time subsequent to the giving of the Law, w iei Moses and the people were busy in preparing the tabernacle, ark, &c, &c. The Jethro episo * The Israelites had waggons even with them : cf. Numbers vii. 3.