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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 329
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 329. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 329. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/389

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 329, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 329
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_355.jpg
Transcript ^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■1 SINAI. In the expedition of Tabuc a town situated on the route to Damascus, which Mohammad undertook against the inclination of his people, M who inclined heavily towards the earth/1 the Prophet passed by Hejer, the country of the ancient Thamudites. Hiotigh the) wen i distressed by heat and thirst he forbade his army to draw any water there, but ordered them if they drank of that water to bring it up again, or if they had kneaded ain meal with it to give it to their camels. He himself wrapped his face m his garment and spurred on his mule, crying out, "Enter not the houses of those wicked men. but rather weep lest that happen unto you which befell th(jm !"—Thus much for the traditions ni |ebel Mi i The geographical position of Jebel Musa, with reference to the Bible narrative, must, of course, be an important factor in every attempt to settle which mountain should be "the Mountain of the Law." This is the account of the movements of th, [n Exodus, Chapter xix. (which one may suppose to be either Moses' own writing, or to contain at leasl the first record which he made of the march from the Red Sea), we have, " In the third month, when the children of Israel were gone forth out of the- land of Egypt, the same Aa\ came they into the wilderness of Sinai," that is, on the same day of the month the ai the chronology, so like what one finds in the Egyptian monuments and papyri, is much m dent than accuracy as to the geography and the stations on the rout were depn from Rephidim, and were come to the desert of Sinai, and had pitched in the u ild< i ft and there Israel camped before the mount. And Moses went up unto God, and the Lord called unto him out of the mountain," &c Now except in chapter xviii, recording ili«- irisit of fethro, the only historical "Mountain of God" which is brought before us l>\ Mm that II where (iod appeared to him in the burning bush, and of which aid emphaticallj (Exodus iii. 12),"Certainly I will be with thee, and this shall be a token unto thee that I I When thou hast brought forth the people out of Egypt, ye shall serve God upon this mountain Ihe narrative; of Moses' successive interviews with the Pharaoh 1< m impression that from day to day he did not know what mode of deliverance* (iod would adopt, nor what would the route taken, nor the manner of conducting the people when delivered in order to Wish them in the Promised Land. All was vague and misty. There was Egypt, the house of bondage, near at hand; far off was the land where Abraham, two or three centuries had lived merely as agreat pastoral chief, with no defined country or territorial boundai in between, as it were, was a stupendous enterprise, sufficient to have ani/ing powers and endurance of the greatest of generals,- illumined only by that I the Divine leadership of which the after-worship at Horeb was to be the tola The thirty-third chapter of Numbers is undoubtedly a most important document. Ihe second verse tells us, "Moses wrote their goings out according to their journeys by the commandment of the Lord : and these are their jour: CCOrding to their goin I be words naturally convey to the reader that the several breakings up of the encampment ind s of their march, and that the length of the halt is of no consequei II SerbAl, it is not Sinai, which is to be remembered, but it is the moving on to the goal, vi/. the