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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 327
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 327. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/387.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 327. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/387

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 327, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/387.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 327
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_353.jpg
Transcript SINAI. this mountain. Professor Palmer has cleverly pieced together and arranged for us the real story-'f the mark of the camel's foot near the summit of Jebel Musa. which is an obi© such peculiar veneration amongst the Bedawin.* There is of course a first prejudice to be »Ot over for every one supposes that the name of the rock-mark, Athar Nagat en WW, ••the footprint of the Prophet's she-camel," must refer to Mohammad, and also to his ni-ht journey to heaven. But the marvellous animal he used for his marvellous journej was Borftk Prophets, it is said, were wont to use that kind of animal for their peregrinations. Parti) partly mule, it had the face of a man and the body of a horse. Milk white was its colour ; its mane was of the finest pearls, its ears emeralds, and its eyes Sparkling jacinths. Its whole bod) the wings with which it was furnished, and its flowing tail, bristled with the of its swiftness, not only its name, which signifies t4 Lightning/1 but the events ot Mohammad's journey are sufficient proof. The hollow in the rock may be artificial, as the monks d<< tared it to the prefect of the Franciscan convent at Cairo, who visited them In the eighteenth century; btit it has a very natural appearance, although tho eye must be educated t" < .0 once the shape of a camels foot. In the Cor 4nf however, Mohammad has a legend that a certain prophet Saleh, a messenger of God to an incorrigibly impious tribe named I hann them, on their importunity, a sign of his mission by causing a she camel, big with your omc forth from a rock. This Nebi Saleh of the Cor'An is, wo may conclude, die Nebl Sllel \\ idy es Sheikh, whose tomb is the great shrine of the religious worship of tin liedau in of the peninsula; and further we may argue that the prophet of tin- camel's foot print on the summit of Jebel Musa is Nebl Saleh of the ( Wan and of the adj.i mI that tin Thamudites, the tribe to which Nebi Saleh himself belonged, were .1 primitive people, the early inhabitants of Sinai. lint who was Nebi Saleh? The word Saleh is connected with "righteous," and for a moment one thinks of Melchizedek, King of Salem. lint pass this 1 Ihe Bedawy lu . but a vague idea as to the individuality of Moses, Klias, or Saleh. When one looks at the sign given, and considers, too, the veneration in which Nebi Saleh is held, may it not be conceivable that Saleh is Moses himself? The stories in the Cor'an which surround the miracle worked by Saleh are childish and ridiculous; still it is well to note the stricken rock after prayer producing a live camel, the greatest of Bedawy blessings, the subsequent rebellion of the people to whom the prophet addressed his warnings — and the terrible destruction sent by God upon them. The Cor'an says that the tribe of Thamud inhabited I [ejer, a mountainous district, wl they had cut out for themselves habitations in the rocks. It is described territorj in the province of 1 lejaz, between Medina and Syria, a loose definition, but applicable to the country on the east coast of the Gulf of Akabah, and consequently very little removed from the peninsula proper. From the commentaries on the Cor'an we gather that thr '[ hamudites defied SAleh * Th, Bedawin ^irls, when tending their flocks on these mountains, will often milk tl, BtO «t. U t» ometimes say that tl ■-lary on ul.u.h ftfoti