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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 318
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 318. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/378.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 318. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/378

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 318, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/378.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 318
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_344.jpg
Transcript 3i8 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. forth their sympathy, and began with their paws to scoop out a grave. When Anthony saw this he was awe-struck, and blessed them, saying, " O Lord, without whose divine providence no leaf can stir upon the tree, no little bird fall to the ground, bless these creatures according to their nature, who have thus honoured the dead!" Then Anthony took up the corpse, wrapped it in the cloak of St. Athanasius, and laid it reverently in the grave. After this Anthony lived fourteen years, till his one hundred and fifth year. Feeling at length that his end was near, he summoned his disciples and took leave of them. With a few monks he retired to a more solitary place. There, having exacted of them a promise that they would not reveal the place of his burial, whilst they prayed around him, he gently drew his last breath. It is to St. Anthony, then, " the father of abbots," and to St. Paul the hermit, that the two monasteries are dedicated. The Dayr Mar Antonios is reached from the Nile by following a broad valley called Wady el Arraba, which opens out nearly opposite Benisooef. This valley takes its name from the carts (araba or aroba, " plaustrum ") which used to carry the provisions to the two monasteries—but there is also a tradition that it is so called from the chariots of Pharaoh, who pursued the Israelites down this valley as they fled away to the Red Sea. The monastery claims to be the oldest in Egypt. The lofty walls enclose an irregular pile of buildings, as well as a large garden where there are date-palms, carob-trees, &c, and an abundance of vegetables— for the garden is well watered from a spring which bursts out from the rock behind the convent. In this spring Miriam, Moses' sister, is said to have bathed at the time of the Exodus. There are some five or six churches in the convent and a large twelve-domed church in the garden; in one of these, dedicated to St. Anthony, there are some very old and curious frescoes. High up in the cliff is the Cave of St. Anthony, from which there is a grand view of the Egyptian desert, the Red Sea, and the Sinaitic range beyond. How often in this desert among these barren wastes must have ascended to heaven the evening hymn and the vesper prayer of monks and hermits. ''Everywhere, all at once," suggests Montalembert, " the air echoed the hymns, the prayers, the songs pious and solemn, tender and joyous, of these champions of the soul and conquerors of the desert. then the traveller, the pilgrim, and especially the new convert stood still—lost in emotion and transported with the sounds of that sublime concert—and would cry aloud, " Behold, this is Paradise !" From Egypt the monastic spirit overflowed into Arabia, Syria, and Palestine. Sinai was occupied by hermits and monks almost as soon as the Thebaid. The mountain where God gave His law to Moses was the scene of a constant struggle between Saracen or Arab and monk. But the destroyers tired sooner than the monks, and in a measure became converted by the gentle teaching of St. Nilus—the great monastic coloniser of Mount Sinai— and by the example set them in the piety of his followers. Tor, with its oasis, seems, as we have said, to have been chosen by the monks for then c landing-place. Close down to the shore, and also in the hills to the north, are the remains