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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 316
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 316. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/376.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 316. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/376

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 316, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/376.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 316
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_342.jpg
Transcript 3i6 PICTURESQUE PALESTLNE. they are drawn to land, and monks lose their strength in towns; let us return quickly to our mountains, like fish to the water/' The name of St. Paul the hermit is inseparably connected with St. Anthony's. Seventy years had Anthony lived in the Thebaid, and the thought began to steal over him that no one before had ever lived such a life of solitude and self-devotion. But in the night's silence he heard a voice, " There is one holier than thou art, for Paul the hermit has served God in solitude and penance for ninety years ! " On waking, Anthony determined to go and seek this Paul. As he journeyed across the desert he met a creature, half man half horse—a centaur, of whom he asked the way. Further on in a deep valley he met a satyr. The satyr bowed before him and said, " I am one of those creatures who haunt the woods and fields, and who are worshipped by the blind Gentiles as gods. But we are mortals, as thou knowest; and I come to beseech thee to pray for me and my people to thy God, who is my God and the God of all." When Anthony heard these words of the satyr the tears ran down his venerable face, and he stretched out his hand towards Thebes and cried, " Such be your gods, 0 ye pagans ! Woe unto you when such as these confess the name of Christ, whom ye, blind and perverse generation, deny !" At length on the third day he reached a cavern overhung by wild and savage rocks, with a palm near and a fountain trickling at its roots. There he found the hermit Paul, to whom this cave had been a home for near ninety years. Paul would hardly break his solitude to receive St. Anthony. At length he admitted him, and the two aged men held long communion with each other beneath the shade of the palm-tree. While they talked on the state of the world and of idolatry in the presence of Christianity, time was forgotten. There came, however, a raven and alighted on the tree; then after a little while the bird flew away—but to return, carrying in his beak a small loaf which he dropped between them. Paul lifted up his eyes and blessed the goodness of God, and said, " For sixty years every day hath this raven brought me half a loaf, but because thou art come, my brother, lo! the portion is doubled, and we are fed as Elijah was in the wilderness." Then they ate, and drank of the water of the fountain, and returned thanks. After this Paul said to Anthony, " My brother, God hath sent thee here that thou mightest receive my last breath and bury me. Go, return to thy dwelling, bring here the cloak which was given thee by that holy bishop Athanasius, wrap me in it, and lay me in the earth." Anthony was amazed, for the gift of this cloak some years before was unknown to every one. He could only do as Paul begged him ; so kissing him he returned to his monastery. Arrived there he took down the cloak and hastened on his way back, fearful lest in the meanwhile Paul might have died. When he was three hours' journey from the cave he suddenly heard a sound of ravishing music. Looking up he beheld the spirit of Paul, bright as a star and white as the driven snow, carried up to heaven by the prophets and apostles and a company of angels, who were singing hymns of triumph as they bore him through the air. When all had disappeared, Anthony fell on his face and wept, and threw dust on his head, exclaiming, " Alas, Paul! alas, my brother ! why hast thou left me ? . Why have I known thee so late, to lose thee so early.