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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 314
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 314. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/374.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 314. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/374

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 314, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/374.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 314
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_340.jpg
Transcript 3i4 PICTURESQUE PALESTLNE. very little expenditure of time and money would make a small harbour here, and drain the marshy ground. At one time it must have had a certain amount of life and bustle, and to this the chapels and cells in the hills behind the town bear witness. The hot springs, the pleasant palm-groves, the comparative propinquity to Egypt—these combine to make Tor not an unlikely place to which pilgrims and anchorites would resort. On the opposite coast of the Red Sea, some ten or fifteen miles inland and fifty miles to the north-west, are the famous convents of St. Anthony and St. Paul. There is every reason to suppose that we may place the regular constitution of the monastic order at the close of the third century, and that Egypt was the cradle of monasticism in its Christian garb. Monasticism was not the invention but the inheritance of Christianity. The human mind seems always to have had a desire to flee away to the wilderness and be at rest. Retirement and solitude, quite apart from any teaching of Christianity, have again and again, at different ages and in different climates, suggested themselves as the safer conditions under which frail man may be able to obtain conquest over self, and attain to the perfection of God. It does not matter whether the result has been successful, or whether men—who have thus retired from the world—have lost sight of the discipline which God has ordained for us by stationing us in the world. The fact remains that to a variety of dispositions, and under the most opposed circumstances of life, separation from the world has suggested itself as the only panacea for the diseases of the soul. Look at the Buddhist order of mendicants; call to mind the life of Elijah, the vows of the Nazarites, the story of Jonadab the son of Rechab, the influence of Essenes and Therapeutae— the monks of Judaism ! At far-off places in the history of humanity will be found abundant proofs of the widespread conviction that withdrawal from the world is the first step towards mastery of self. From the cell of the anchorite to the stately building of the monastery the transition is easy ! The struggles of " the athletes of penitence " drew disciples not only in the times of persecution, when the far-off caves inhabited by holy men might serve as a refuge, but much more in the time of the Church's peace. The luxury and the profligacy of the Roman empire seemed a worse enemy than the cruelty of tyrants. The one was open, visible, fearful; the other secret, gentle, honey-mouthed, captivating in form and habit. The one was like the blast and roar of a terrible tempest, the other like the soft scented breeze of summer evenings. Take then the history of Anthony, "the father of asceticism,"—young, rich, noble, of honourable Christian parentage, living in the balmy climate of Upper Egypt. More than one thousand six hundred years ago he chanced to hear read in church the words of the Gospel, " If thou wouldest be perfect, go, sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come, follow me!" He applied the words to himself. His parents being dead, he made provision for his only and dependent sister, and sold his estate. Giving the price ot it to the poor, he plunged into the desert to work out his own salvation. By macerations, fasting, prayer (prayer as long as the night), incessantly struggling against the devil and the flesh, he overcame at last the enemy which wars against the spirit. Twenty years he spent near the Nile, now shut up in a ruined castle for months together with only bread and water