Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 303
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 303. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/361.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 303. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/361

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 303, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/361.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 303
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_327.jpg
Transcript ^^^^^- ^m^^^mmmmm^mm^maaa^^^^'''^KmmmmmmammmmmmmKmmmm SINAI 303 "Mountain of the'Windmill "). It is not a high mountain-some seven hundred feet only of scramble—but its position is marvellous! The beautiful valley meanders at its feet with the limpid stream flowing past the ruins of the ancient city; beyond and right in front, over- poweringly grand, is seen the whole form of Serbal: to the north there is a mighty basin of red rocks, out of and above which the tall peak of Jebel el Benat rears itself; while, far away to the south-east, is seen the long range of the Jebel Musa mountains, blue against a deeper blue sky. Jebel Tahiineh is the mountain from which traditionally Moses viewed the battle with Amalek, climbing up to it by a path which commences just before the grove of El Hesweh is reached. The tradition as to this site was current in the days of Antoninus Martyr (circ. a.d. 600), for in his Itinerary he says: "So we came to the city of Pharan" (this translation occurs in the Appendix to the "Desert of the Exodus"), "where Moses fought with Amalek, where is an oratory whose altar is set on those stones which, while Moses was praying, they put under him. In this very place is the city, fortified with walls of brick, and a place very barren, except in the neighbourhood of the wells." If Feiran be Rephidim, no hill to which Moses would have access could be so suitable. He would have before him the whole plan of the Amalekite defence in the two valleys, Feiran and 'Aleyat, and from here he would be seen by the advancing Israelites with his hands upraised to heaven till the sun w*ent down. Of course there is no way of estimating the numbers of the Amalekites. At this present time the Bedawin of Sinai number, according to their own accounts, about four thousand males ; for the Arab does not count the females nor the younger boys of his family in a census of the tribe. As to the arms used by them, one may make a conjecture from the descriptions of the wars of the Egyptian kings, from the bas-reliefs, &c, of the tombs and temples of Egypt, and from passages in the Bible itself. They had their weapons of the chase—the bow and arrow, such as Esau used, or the sling, so commonly seen now in Upper Egypt. These were used as weapons of war, in addition to spear and sword and shield. Swords and spears were the principal weapons in later times, and are made memorable in the wars between the Israelites and Philistines. The Egyptian infantry at this period (for we need not consider the horsemen and chariots) were divided and classified as bowmen, spearmen, swordmen, clubmen, and slingers. Their various defensive arms consisted of bow, spear, two species of javelin, sling (the sling was a thong of leather or string, plaited like those used to drive away the birds from the corn-fields of Upper Egypt, broad in the middle, and having a loop at one end by which it was fixed upon and firmly held with the hand, the other extremity terminating in a lash, which escaped from the finger as the stone was thrown), a short and straight sword, dagger, knife, falchion, axe or hatchet, battle-axe, pole-axe, mace or club, and a curved stick, like those in use now amongst Egyptians and Arabs, and called lissan, "tongue." The falchion, a short sword of a curious curved shape, must have been a most formidable weapon, as also the axe, which Ramses IL is seen so often to wield, when with gigantic force he smites his smiling enemies. The curved stick seems the most insignificant of these arms, but it is not so. It is about two and a half feet long, and made of tough acacia or other hard wood ; and tribes who are armed