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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 302
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 302. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/360.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 302. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/360

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 302, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/360.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 302
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_326.jpg
Transcript '«■ 6 Q2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. country, another crossed the Red Sea and occupied the country to the south of Egypt, and a third went on to the north of Egypt and founded the Shasu kingdom. It is certain, from Balaam's words (Numbers xxiv. 20), that the Amalekites were much more than a mere handful of Bedawin. The great regenerator of Egypt, Thotmes III., may have driven them out, may have recovered the rich mines of the peninsula, and may have crushed their power by frequent campaigns ; but they still remained a powerful nation, commanding two great roads of commerce, the one from Phoenicia and the Canaanite countries to Egypt, the other to Southern Asia, Arabia, and Africa, by the Elanitic arm of the Red Sea. In the expedition of the four kings under Chedorlaomer, described in Genesis xiv., after the rebellion of the King of Sodom and his confederates, the Amalekites are mentioned in connection with the mountain tribes whom the great king punished previous to the campaign against the King of Sodom. This goes to prove that the idea which derives the Amalekite nation from Esau s grandson, Amalek, is erroneous; and it also accounts for the silence in the Bible as to there being any relationship between Amalekite and Edomite, or between Amalekite and Israelite. God's anger against Amalek is not grounded on Amalek's faithlessness to the obligation of consanguinity, as in the case of Edom (" because he did pursue his brother with the sword," Amos i. 11, or Obadiah 12), but on the insolent arrogance of Amalek, who feared not Jehovah. At Rephidim, we may 6e certain, the children of Israel expected to be able to get water for themselves and their cattle ; and at Rephidim they found this water strictly guarded by the terrible enemies who, for the last two days, had been harassing their flanks and rear. The valley, becomes very tortuous after passing Hesy el Khattatin, making it six miles of travelling before one has accomplished three and a half miles of direct progress. One skirts the pretty palm- grove of El Hesweh, three miles from the Stricken Rock, where, in all probability, the first line of the Amalekites would be drawn up. The general direction of the valley is still a very little south of east, and runs parallel with the mountain. Its southern side is here formed by the northern slopes of Serbal and its mighty granite outworks. The mountain is drawn back some three or four miles, and lies, not north and south, but east and west—a magnificent pile, forming at its summit a ridge three miles in length. From the extremities of this northern front two plainly defined valleys (Wady 'Ajeleh on the west, and Wady 'Aley&t on the east), rough, stony, and inhospitable, stretch down like long arms to Wady Feiran. They enclose in their grasp a tumbled mass of mountains, of no distinct shape, called Jebel el Muarras,* which rises above Feiran some two thousand five hundred feet. There is no wide plain at the base of Serbal, and the Amalekites must have been crowded together in the valley bed, opposing to the Israelites a front of less than a quarter of a mile. At the mouth of Wady 'Aleyat, which is wider and more noticeable than the exit of Wady ' Ajeleh (two-thirds of a mile to the west of it), is the mound EI Maharrad, where are the ruins of the ancient city Pharan (Feiran). On the northern side of the narrow valley, exactly opposite the city, is Jebel Tahiineh (the * The highest point of this lower mass of Serbal is called Jebel Abu Shiah.