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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 299
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 299. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/357.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 299. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/357

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 299, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/357.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 299
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_323.jpg
Transcript ,) I I • SINAI. 299 the word " ground which has been drained and left dry " suggests not mountains only, but the plains or valleys surrounding them. As mountain names of daily Bedawin use " Sinai " and " Horeb " have disappeared ; nor do we trace any vestige of the words, unless we may argue that Jebel 'Aribeh, on the other side of the convent valley, has some etymological affinity with Horeb, and that Jebel Sona, the conspicuous mountain which rises over against Ras Sufsafeh, and commands a view of both the plain Er Rahah and the Wady es Sheikh, recalls ■ legitimately the word Sinai. To some it seems probable that the name Horeb has been introduced by a later writer into Exodus xvii., if not into Exodus iii. as well. For such process of difficulty-climbing there may be an insufficiency of evidence to go upon. Better, therefore, to adhere to the assumption that the whole of this portion of the desert was known at first as Horeb, and that the name was attached subsequently to the mountain alone. But this encampment at Rephidim is famous not only for the miraculous supply of water from the rock, but also because the Israelites here first saw war. " Then came Amalek and fought with Israel in Rephidim" (Exodus xvii. 8). Something of the nature of the warfare adopted by the mighty desert tribe is told us in the fragment which occurs at the end of Deut. xxv. The Amalekites met Israel by the way. Like the Afghans in the fatal Khyber Pass, they hovered round them, and untiringly harassed the hindmost of them, the feeble ones of that great multitude, so faint and so weary. The scenery and characteristics of the valley give a meaning to the attack of the Amalekites. Feiran is to-day the Paradise of the Bedawin. What the oasis of Ammon is in the western desert of the Nile, .so is Feiran in the Sinaitic peninsula. Quite marvellous is its beauty, for the stream is perennial, being fed by the waters collected on the northern and eastern sides of Jebel Musa, and drawn off by Wady es Sheikh into Wady Feiran. The tamarisks, the palm-trees, the. nebbuk-trees, the tall reeds by the side of the running brook, the sound of the singing of birds, the life of growing things—and all this made more conspicuous by the desert which has been one's home so many days ! As now there is a sacred tomb for the Bedawin devotees, and some approach to a permanent settlement with enclosed gardens and plantations, so in those ancient days for the Amalekites this must have been a centre of their tribal existence, and not improbably a sanctuary of their gods. Scouts had told them then of the strange moving mass coming out of Egypt, not as captives to toil in the mines, but with all the pride of a victorious people laden with rich spoil glittering in gold and silver and jewel. The cry " To arms!" had echoed through the hills. From out the valleys, such aswe have seen running up beneath the southern side of Serbal, from the plains of the northern plateau of the Tih, the tribesmen had flocked in towards Feirans oasis, in order to protect the most prized of all the districts of their mountain territory. And these Amalekites! it is very noticeable with how lengthy a period in the Bible story they are connected. • They are like an " evil genius " to the early life of the people of God. Whence came they ? are they met with in the annals of other nations ? Herr Brugsch, in his account of the Hyksos kings of Egypt,* tells us of an ancient tradition preserved * Brugsch's " Egypt of the Pharaohs," vol. i. p. 266.