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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 293
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 293. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 293. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/351

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 293, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/351.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 293
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_317.jpg
Transcript SINAI 293 Switzerland in the early summer present sometimes something of the same appearance as one nears their glaciers. Dean Stanley reminds us that these wadies were the only conception of rivers in the mind of the Arab conquerors of Spain. The consequence is that we find the name as introduced by them still attached (i) to the water-courses of Southern Spain, which, like the valleys of Arabia, are dried-up confused hollows of stones and boulders, until the snow melts or the sudden fierce showers descend ; and also (2) to mighty rivers, to which the streams of the desert, even when forced into life by the winter storms, could at best furnish only a general parallel. " Guad-al-quiver," grand and imposing river, pride of the Spaniard—who knows, or troubles himself to knows that this name breathes of the far-off desert air of Arabia, and that it is, with little variation in the spelling, the " Guad-al-Khebir," i.e. the "Great Wady!" The process of reasoning by which this similarity would be established is by no means far-fetched. Wady Feiran, which we strike at right angles, certainly does resemble a mighty river; and one almost expects to hear the roar of its rush, or even to see the light play on the dull tawny- coloured waters. There is a further point of resemblance between the river and the wady. The wady is the highway of the desert. From the fact that the watersheds are frequently low and narrow one might thread one's way through the peninsula by merely following the courses of these valleys, when once one had mastered the general direction of the main arteries. The great Wady es Sheikh, for instance, which Stanley calls " the queen of the Sinaitic rivers/' is not really separated from Wady Feiran ; and by means of the two valleys you may bring a road of easy communication from the sea to Jebel Musa, however lengthened out by the numerous windings. Suppose the Thames to be drained dry and its sides bordered by great mountains, we should have something very like a Sinaitic wady, and put it to the same use. Water and verdure, in any great extent, are wanting; and* so the distinguishing names for the wadies, as for the mountains, are taken from the noticeable presence of that which is so scarce. The second highest mountain in the peninsula is called Umm Shomer, i.e. the "Mother of Fennel; " Ras Sufsafeh is the " Head or Peak of the Willows," from the group of two or three scant willows growing in the hollow beneath the last ascent; Sinai may have taken its name from the tree " seneh " (Hebrew), which the Arabs call "seyal; " Wady Taiyebeh means the " Wady of Goodly Water," with its consequent vegetation ; Wady el 'Ain, the " Wady of the Fountain," or "Well;" Wady Tarfah, the "Valley of the Tamarisks;" Wady Sidreh is named from the bushes of " sidr ;" Wady Saal, from the splendid " seyal " trees it contains, &c, &c. A spring of water, a tree, a few shrubs, these are the points of greatest interest to the poor Arab, and these form his distinguishing landmarks in these intricate valleys. Soon after descending into Wady Feiran, the course bearing east or a very little south of east, at the entrance of Wady Nisrin, are some fourteen or fifteen stone circles and cairns. These circles are from ten to twenty feet in diameter, and in the centre of each is a cist about four feet long by two and a half broad, and of the same depth, composed of four stones and a covering slab. Inside some of these have been found human bones, teeth, &c, and in one a small copper bracelet, lance and arrow heads, and a necklace of marine shells. The 99