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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 290
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 290. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 290. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/348

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 290, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 290
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_314.jpg
Transcript 29o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. There it stood, dry and brown enough certainly, but as perfect in shape as when it was first set up—perhaps before the Great Pyramid was built" ("Desert of the Exodus," pao-e 20-) In this cave or mine no trace of metal or turquoise was found, so the object of those ancient miners who worked it out could not be conjectured. In the valley below are two hieroglyphic tablets which prove its Egyptian origin, and these tablets, unlike those in the neighbouring valley, are so time-worn that the sacred writing is illegible. After this break Wady Igne, or, as it is sometimes called, Wady Magharah, is soon gained, and a fresh scene opens out on this ever-varying route. Hardly had I got abreast of the mouth of the wady before half-a-dozen Arabs, springing from nowhere—so undistinguishable at first were their bronze forms from the red-tinted rocks -ran down the mountain-side, thinking that I might be a merchant come to purchase turquoise. These few miners are the representatives, as it were, of the thousands who had toiled here ages ago for Pharaoh. In the left-hand bank of the steep sandstone wall of the wady are the principal mines, and in the walls of these caverns and in the fissures and cuttings in the rock are the marks of the many chisels (probably of bronze or other hard metal) of the ancient captives who here searched for turquoise. The tablets—some in situ, some overturned and half destroyed—are of the familiar Egyptian type : a Pharaoh of gigantic proportions slaying his enemies; priests presenting offerings to hawk-headed deities ; troops of captives, &c. Not unnaturally, as one stoops and shuffles along these gloomy caverns, one thinks of the scene so vividly portrayed in Professor Ebers' " Egyptian Princess," and almost hopes that one may come across the ghosts of the creatures of his subtle brain. On the little hill behind the remains of the late Major Macdonald's house are the ruins of some small stone huts, where possibly superintendents and military guardians of the captive miners lived. There is a tablet in the rocks above the mines which represents a group of miners at work, equipped with ordinary chisels and a kind of swivel hammer. The soldier guarding them is armed with a bow and arrow, and is, Professor Palmer suggests, " the prototype of the present Egyptian police officer, who is still called a cawwas, or archer." Another tablet on the hills opposite the mines and near the mouth of the valley, discovered by Professor Palmer, represents in rude style a miner taking a walk with his wife and son. Ah, how little varied is human life ! As to the dates of the inscriptions, Senoferu, of the Third Dynasty, records here his conquest of the country and his discovery of the mines, while the latest of the tablets belongs to the Eighteenth Dynasty, and mentions an expedition to the mines set on foot by Tothmes (or Thutmes) III. The mines evidently were worked at intervals during a period of more than two thousand years, and probably to a later date than that assigned to Tothmes III.; but we may suppose that some three thousand years have elapsed since Magharah ceased to be a penal settlement of the Egyptians. Wady Mukatteb (the " Written Valley," or " Valley of Inscriptions "), so far as scenery goes, is not over-interesting. One seems to leave the finer scenery as one emerges from Wady Igne and crosses the Seih Sidreh. The valley is broad and open ; on one side are low sloping hills, and on the other some fine ranges of mountain. Beneath the low hills are several isolated