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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 286
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 286. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/343.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 286. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/343

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 286, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/343.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 286
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_309.jpg
Transcript mmmammmmmmmmm^zma^^m 286 PICTURESQUE PALESTLNE. right (see page 274) the threatening form of Jebel Hammam Far'un, and on their left (see page 274) beyond the wilderness of Sin, and beyond the trending line of beach where the waves break laughingly, the distant view of the mountains which close in to form the outposts of Serbal. Here then, or a little farther on, may have been the " encampment of the Red Sea." There is a sandy cape, very lonely, jutting into the sea, about a mile from the mouth of Wady Taiyebeh (see page 275), called Ras Abu Zenimeh, from a saint of that name who lies buried there. The well, or tomb, is a rude hut built up of very light materials, well white-washed, part wreckage, part palm-branches, and covered with coarse matting, but is a somewhat conspicuous object on the lonely shore. Inside there is a strange collection of offerings, principally maritime—bits of rag, of rope, of matting, with meat tins, fish-bones, and lamps intermingled. There is a picturesque desolation about the place to which the dry stunted shrubs on the banks of the sloping shore add character. Many and beautiful are the shells, amongst which grows or drifts the so-called rose of Jericho (Anastatiea hierochuntina), its stiff stem and its tiny clustering branches, with their bibulous flowers, looking like a grey withered twig stuck into the sand.* This portion of the coast is called El Markheiyeh (the diminutive of El Markha), and forms the last narrowing section of the undulating plain.of gravel which, as we said before, in a measure bounds the triangle of Sinai on its south-western side (see page 251). It is separated from the plain called El Markha by a long white spur of chalk hills which runs down to the sea till within a few feet of high-water mark. The illustration (see page 275) shows the position of this ridge and the unwilling camels, who yet will have to wade for a few minutes through the sea, so as to avoid a long detour over the hill. In its far angle there is one scanty spring, but the water is undrinkable. Our course will lie across the plain in a line from the extreme sea end of the ridge to Seih Bab'a, six miles distant. But this taste of its extreme dreariness, without shadow of shelter in the full light of the midday sun, the sea glaring on the one hand, and the white unpicturesque hills glaring on the other hand (see page 278), will be, even if the sirocco wind does not rise up against us, as trying as any piece of work before us in our whole journey. Seih Bab'a is the debouchure of the Wadies Bab'a and Shellal. Great slag heaps mark the entrance ; and the traveller—weary of the dry, baked, glowing plain—gladly turns aside by them to make his way to Magharah, Feiran, and the convent by the pass of Nagb Buderah. The Israelites in all probability followed a more open route, skirting the edge of the low white cliffs, with the sea still on their right hand, until the entrance of the Wady Feiran was reached, some eighteen miles farther south. The shorter way through the mountains is neither over- steep nor tortuous, but it leads into a mining district where in former days, as at Sarabit el Khadim, Egyptian soldiery would be stationed. in This plant has nothing to do with that mentioned in Eccles. xxiv. 14, &c. It derives its botanical name from its power of open, g minute flowers, when plunged into water, many months after it has been pulled up. » Jericho " may have been added to ■' resurrect.on flo (anastaUca) because it is found in the sand in the hot plains by the Dead Sea. The pilgrims, who prize it as a relic, may in irony have call the rose of Jericho."