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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 284
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 284. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/341.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 284. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/341

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 284, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/341.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 284
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_307.jpg
Transcript 284 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. war is to plunder, or to occupy a poor bit of pasture land, or to get the use of some wr wells of brackish water, are but withered unsightly branches of a far nobler trunk. The a pastoral population grown out of and round the real fixed nation. The circumstance the country and the* difficulties of the climate compelled them to wander, and so to encroach noticeable in the early history of the Egyptian Delta) on lands which from their fertility and capabilities had attracted the primaeval colonists of the human race. Possibly, at r. tt encroachments, not resulting in permanent occupation, would escape notice ; and ence would give encouragement to insolence and rapine, until the very civilisation which iild have checked or absorbed the Arabs seemed to them to be but a contemptible tf because possessed by a people willing to be preyed upon and pillaged. Anything which may be said of the Arab tribes and their nationality. beginnings of the Israelite people. The symmetry of the later Jewish commonwealth 5 times blinds us and prevents us from imagining that there ever could have been ,1 I <>r instance, we seldom think of the twelve tribes or clans, unequal in strength, as being divided between themselves or engaged in tribal wars. We hardl) picture the tribesmen in the full strength of their manly independence They always appeal being led by opportunist leaders ; for the life of the nation in the time of the I confusedly put before us'that even in that interval we seem to be reading the histOT a hoin< »us nation, living under an orderly government, however weak and | the presence of stronger neighbouring people. Mr. Palgrave bids us see the Arab tri almost from the first split up, each and all, into two branches, correlative, but unequal in siic and importance, The larger portion became townsmen and villagers with perma upations, gendering necessarily culture. The smaller portion gave itself up to the pastoral life in that hard desert land, whose valleys are only distinguishable by less degl barrenne The one division of the clan under the favourable circumstances oi settled UR advanced, the other retrograded, till at length it bore the same relation to the fellow-countrymen (though pure in descent, and competent to trace out a line ol ano il tree which would intoxicate the European pedant in heraldry) which a wild c offshoot below does to the thriving and fruit-laden branches above. It is in tin- midst of his description of his life at Hofhoof, far away near to the the Persian Gulf, that Mr. Pal-rave, having given a most lucid account of the conventw n •• Nabathcean," points out how confusion likewise has burdened all our concept** the A with inaccuracies and misapplications. The passage is too pointed to condensation. II.- "The European public is deluged with accounts et" Arab Vrab qualities, houses, dresses, women, warriors, and what not : the most pfl materials collected in Syria, Mesopotamia, Egypt, 'Irak, perhaps Tunis, AI ntl • or at th.- 1 Djiddah and on the \i<A Sea coast Sometimes a romantic spiritwil among the hybrid Bedawin of Palmyra as portraits A Ar.il> lit".-: sometime* invited to study Aral, society in a divan at Cairo or Aleppo. Such narratr-