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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 280
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 280. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/337.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 280. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/337

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 280, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/337.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 280
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_303.jpg
Transcript PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. II, lingly ei 1 the Fellah in talk, asking, 'What presents do you give to the bride I Fellah wedding ?' ' What presents ? Why, we give a silk robe, and a cotton rube, and silver ornaments; and then we give so much in money to the father, and so much to the brother, and SO much to the uncles and aunts.' By the time that he had got to the uncles and aunts he perceived that the Bedawy had eaten up three-quarters of the supper, so he in ! iii, Bedawy what they gave the bride at a Bedawy wedding? The Bedawy replied bluntly, ' A tob (robe), a veil, a necklace, and a headdress.' He continued eating till all was finished, having the lellah still very hungry and done out of his supper." 1 think I ought to place by this the next story told by Mrs. Finn, in which the tab turned on a Bedawy. It happened that a Bedawy came to a village one evening in the summer id the public r n of the guest-house. For supper amongst other things the lellah In,,i set before him some prickly pears the fruit of the great cactus, which forms the he ommon in 1'alestine, &c. which he bad never seen, and which was then in In mockery of his ignorance they did not shell the prickly pears, but left them in the h ^k all I with their innumerable sharp spines. The Bedawy, unsuspicious, took up and ate the fruit as ho was accustomed to eat cucumbers; after supper his host asked him how he liked thei God be praised for them, they are very refreshing," said the man; "only the hair upon them is rather sharp, it is rougher than the hairs on cucumbers, and it sticks to mj t": •III* l > 111.11 ! Mr. I' in his " Central and Eastern Arabia," warns one: not to accept without much the favourable pictures which travellers draw sometimes of the good faith and pitality of the bedawin. Of the first he writes—• ids of the most cold-blooded perfidy are by no means uncommon among tl nomades, and Strangers under their guidance and protection, nay, even their own kindred and thren of the desert, are but too often the victims of such conduct. To lead trav< in the wilderness till they fall exhausted by thirst and weariness, and then to plufl and have them to die, is no unfrequent Bedawin procedure Thus, for examp numerous caravan, composed principally of wealthy lews on their way across the il-^vi I us to Bagdad, was, not many years since, betrayed by its Bedawin guid man, while their faithless conductors, after keeping aloof till th' hat thirst and the burning sun had done their work, returned to the scene of death, and constituted themselv< sole ami universal legatees of the moveable goods, gear, and wealth onfiding companions. 1 myself, during my stay at the town of lla'yel. in t - ntral ibia, met with a large Hebrew folio, once the property of one of these unfortunate Israel '" Whose lot it had fallen amid his share of plunder, had brought it thw '" h 0 \m- profitable by the sale of a work all the more valuahl m ' opinion for 1 tolly unintelligible." hospitality h< Nor do 1 wish to deprive them of all credit for thes s "Arabia," vol. i. 3, 36.