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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 276
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 276. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/333.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 276. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/333

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 276, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/333.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 276
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_299.jpg
Transcript 2?6 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. sunset vision of that evening walk above the Wady Taiyebeh. The lines occur in - Julj^ and Maddalo," a conversation piece drawn near Venice :— " We stood Looking upon the evening and the flood Which lay between the city and the shore, Paved with the image of the sky ; . . . . and half the sky Was roofed with clouds of rich emblazonry, Dark purple at the zenith, which still grew Down the steep west into a wondrous hue, Brighter than burning gold, even to the rent Where the swift sun yet paused in his descent Among the many folded hills ; . . . . And then, as if the earth and sea had been Dissolved into one lake of fire, were seen Those mountains, as from waves of flame, Around tbs vaporous sun, from which there came The inmost purple spirit of light, and made Their very peaks transparent" I think it was the music of the jackals which reminded me to get back to camp, and the thought, too, that perhaps a hyaena might be near. This music begins in a sort of I long-drawtl wail, rising and swelling higher and higher until it conquers all other sound* One solitary brute seems to begin, and then, when one thinks it has satisfied itself or has got some plunder, it seems to be reinforced by a whole troop of jumping, prancing friei whom night has let loose to yell and scream and bark and wail The jackal, though it slinks OUt of the way to let one pass, will boldly enter a town, and will come sniffing up in the sill of night to the very canvas of one's tent The. hyaena comes next to the jackal as a mini i prey. Most unclean of all animals—prowling about cemeteries exhuming bod and even where the grave is protected by heavy stones burrowing alongside to get oul miserable corpse the hyaena is a coward, though the Arab believes him to be extraordina cunnin The Arab will tell one how a hunter lay down to sleep, with his Ao^ and p tlask beside him, when the hyaena of whom he was in quest seized the opportunity and the I the latter, and walked off with the powder flask without disturbing the hunter' Amongst the tamarisks, which bend gracefully over the stream, and amid the tall trunks die palms, some wild and unkempt and some of better appearance as if they had 1 cultivated Un- dates, the Arabs and the tents look most picturesque. We shall come to much tnarisks or tarfah-trees at Feirin, and again in Wady es Sheikh, still we may make sow notes about them here. When we reach the convent we shall persuade the (EcON sell US some • manna/' which is the highly prized exudation of the tamarisk-tree, h : nothin may be a connection with the miraculous food which fell round th< lr: bike hoar frost it fell on the ground, and the I lebfl >■ " U ha is ti {Man huf) The Arabs call the gummy substance which is tapped from the tamar. l>\ the puncture of a small insect, - Munn.!1 other trees in other countries produce such maw 1 hr harvest i tain ; for unless the season has some rain there will probably I numu h ' o drop for about two months, commencing at the same time as theaprfc