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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 273
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 273. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 273. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/330

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 273, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/330.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 273
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_296.jpg
Transcript wmmmm SIN AT. 27 And it was so ; the vein was found at last and the mine yielded well. When I came to this land aided by the king's genii I began to labour strenuously. The troops came and entirely occupied it, so that none escaped therefrom. My face grew not frightened at the work, I toiled cheerfully. I brought abundance, yea, abundance of turquoise, and obtained yet more by my search. I did not miss a single vein."- Is it not strange to read such a record referring to a time about four thousand years distant from us ? There is another inscription given also by Professor Palmer, which may, perhaps, date from 3766 b.c. It runs thus : " I came to the mines of my lord. I commenced working the mafka (turquoise) at the rate of fifteen men daily. Never was like done in the reign of Senoferu the Justified." But we have to retrace our steps in order to follow the lower route by Wady Taiyebeh. Possibly we may startle in these mountains a herd of gazelles, and our Arabs may get a shot. In "Eothen" (page 308, chap, xxiii.) the Arabs surprise in her sleep a young gazelle, and take the darling prisoner. "I carried her," the description runs, "before me on my camel for the rest of the day and kept her in my tent all night; I did all I could to gain her affections, but the trembling beauty refused to touch food and would not be comforted. Whenever she had a seeming opportunity of escaping she struggled with a violence so painfully disproportioned to her fine delicate limbs that I could not go on with the cruel attempt to make her my own. In the morning, therefore, I set her loose, anticipating some pleasure from the joyous bound with which, as I thought, she would return to her native freedom. She had been so stupefied, however, by the exciting events of the preceding day and night, and was so puzzled as to the road she should take, that she went off very deliberately and with an uncertain step. She was quite sound in limb, but she looked so idiotic that I fancied her intellect might have been really upset. Never, in all likelihood, had she seen the form of a human being until the dreadful moment when she woke from her sleep and found herself in the gripe of an Arab. Then her pitching and tossing journey on the back of a camel, and lastly a soiree with me by candlelight. I should have been glad to know, if I could, that her heart was not broken!"—The gazelle is called "roe and roebuck in our version of the Bible. It was reckoned among the clean animals of the law and was held in high esteem, Solomon's table being specially furnished with it (1 Kings iv. 23). Swift, graceful, gentle, timid, these are the characteristics of the pretty little animal. You see them often in small herds, but Canon Tristram mentions herds of one hundred in number. As to their swiftness, Asahel, Joab's brother, whom Abner slew at last in self-defence, is said (2 Samuel ii. 18) to have been " light of foot as a wild roe" {i.e. gazelle), while amongst the mighty men who flocked to David in the wilderness the Danites are described (1 Chronicles xii. 8) as " men of might, and men of war fit for the battle, that could handle shield and buckler, whose faces were like the faces of lions, and were as swift as the roes [gazelles] upon the mountains." As to their timidity, it supplies a metaphor to the great prophet describing man's fear in the day of the Lord, when (Isaiah xiii. 13, 14) He "will shake the heavens, and the earth shall remove out of her place, in the wrath of the Lord of Hosts, and in the day of His fierce anger; And it shall be as (with) the chased roe [gazelle] and as (with) a