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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 272
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 272. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/329.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 272. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/329

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 272, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/329.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 272
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_295.jpg
Transcript 2;2 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Another niche is seen at the right-hand corner, and in the centre of the chamber is a pillar cut in die solid rock and covered with hieroglyphics. The paint still remains on some- of th —emerald green inside the characters, with a red and black band above and below. 1 supposed now that these monuments were connected with the working of copper-mines in the •hbourhood, and that the temple probably presented to the miners and their guards the ship of the national gods of Egypt. Mines are very numerous in the neighbourhood. Although Robinson failed to find them, Mr. Holland discovered them, and the Ordnance Sur party certified them. The manner of worship of the Egyptians in outlying district .ill a matter about which we know very little. We seem to be approaching towards the Egypti erdotal and royal centres like Thebes or Abydos : but it was never a popular worship rather a pageant of religion set forth in the presence of the people by an exd priestl) The mines were so extensively worked that Sarabit el Khadim may ha. le a religious centre on account of them. Or it is possible that, like Mecca to Mohammad and his followers, this may have been a sacred place of pilgrimage for the ancient Egyptian rid. To ii certain kings may have made pilgrimages, and they may have erected i them a votive column, with his name inscribed. Moses' demand, therefore, that tin 1 might go three days' journey into the desert (which seems to have excited no surprise what' as a demand) to do sacrifice may have been based on national customs existing amongst the i [.Hans. I he inscriptions in the mines about Sarabit el Khadim range from the twelfth dynasty of Egyptian kings down to (though they become very rare at this date) Ramses l\. ntieth dynasty, a period of twelve or thirteen hundred years. Between Ramses 1\. his ancestor, Mineptah 11. (son of Ramses II.), the Pharaoh in whose reign probably I took place, is a space of a hundred years. We may suppose, then, that while were man-lung through Wady Taiyebeh to the Red Sea these mines were in full work in the hills to their left, and that the worship of Hathor, "queen of heaven and earth and the dark depths bdow," or of Supt, " the lord of the East," was being punctually and carefully rendered. It is almost certain that Senoferu, "a good king," who is buried uncle tli' t pyramid so conspicuous from the Nile near Meidoum, was the conqueror of tin mountainous peninsula of Sinai long coveted for its mineral wealth—and that permanent ks at the mines u tablished by him. Before turning our backs on Sarabit el Khadim let us read one of the inscripl Professor Palmer's help. It refers to,, certain Har-ur-ra, superintendent of mines, who anw •it h in the month Phamenoth (January or February), in the nign of one of the k twelfth dynast) (B.C jp.b-2266). The author of the inscription tells us that I once 1. ft the mine, and ho exhorts the chiefs to go there also. " I f your faces fail tl hor will give you her arms to aid you in the work. Heboid me. how 1 tani I had left Egypt i n Bweated, my blo.nl grew hot, I ordered the workmen work and said unto them there is still turquoise in the mine and the vein will be found in I