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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 270
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 270. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/327.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 270. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/327

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 270, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/327.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 270
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_293.jpg
Transcript PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. the inscriptions. In more flourishing times- and especially during the monkish occupation, when l.iraii was so important a centre there must have been suks, or public markets, th an(| permanent colonies of traders, to supply the wants of the inhabitants. I; menting such fairs, writing and speaking the prevalent dialect of the East, would be as likely to leave notices of themselves and their birthplace, &c, as do their successors in other pan the desert to-day. M I imagine/' he says (" Wilderness of the Exodus," page 193), "that the greater part of these inscriptions are due to a commercial people, traders, carriers, and in the land. No less than twelve of those which we copied were bidingual, being written in tiaitic by one and the same hand. The existence of one of these was previously known ; it differs from the rest in being carefully cut with a chisel and enclosed by a border line. Thai many of the writers were Christian is proved by the number of Christian signs. 1 which they used, but it is equally clear from internal evidence that a large proportion of them They must have extended far down into the later monkish times, possibly until of El [slim brought the ancestors of the present inhabitants, Bedawin hordes from ibia proper, to the mountains of Sinai, and dispersed or absorbed that Saracen population of which the monks stood in such mortal fear." In some such way, too, would IV Palmer ccount !<>r the inscriptions on Serbal—that they are possibly the work of those who to tend the beacon fires which were lighted on the highest point (El Madhawwa 'hthouse ") to tell of approaching invaders, just like those at Hazeroth above'Ain Hudh» or those on the road from Syria to Egypt Passing on, then, from the encampment near Sarbiit el Jemel, we halt again at the mouth \\ al\ Nasb r The Valley of the Sacrificial Stone"). This name suggests rites of some an religion* There are here great heaps of slag and other vestiges of the Egyptian miners who once colonized the place, and whose workings for copper, manganese, and turquoise cover th< ighbouring sandstone hills. A few hours' ride from this encampment brings one to the.foot of the mountain seven hundred feet high) of Sarabit el Khadim (" The Heights of the Servant") This name the A derived from a black statue representing a " slave or servant," which removed by the French during their occupation of Egypt, but for which, amongst the rui suitable pedestal was found by Professor Palmer. The Professor also suggests thai a foot I in black stone, which belonged to Major Macdonald, and was found in th have been a portion of the statue itself. The ruins of Sar&Wt el KWdimwa (,i chance in 1701 by Niebuhr, The mountain is of precipitous sandstom ind the climb up its sides is a trying one: there is a scramble over a slide >ping ledge of rock overhanginga precipice and a steep ravine! rhena * ridge is reached connected with a high tableland of sandstone, intersected in sudden ya\ ines and broken up by rising knolls. ()n one of the highest of th< ** ' and mysterious ruins we have come t< There is a small enclosure contained by the of a wall of hewn Stone, about one hundred and sixty feet long from east to west, by *