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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 264
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 264. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/321.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 264. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/321

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 264, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/321.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 264
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_287.jpg
Transcript 264 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. a miracle of his own, and commanded the people to adore him. Thereon the an 1 Gabriel was sent to him in the likeness of a goodly youth, and addressed him thus: "lam one of the servants of my Lord the King, and I desire sentence on a servant of mine For 1 have heaped benefits upon him, and he hath rebelled against me, and denies mv over him, and lays claim to my name and power." Pharaoh answered, " Let him be drov in the sea!" and gave a warrant under his own hand and seal that this should be done. this the angel left him. The Exodus soon followed, and the passage through the Red before Pharaoh's pursuing army, of the twelve tribes of Israel by twelve suddenly-revealed paths. Pharaoh's horse refused to take the unusual road, it is said, until Gabriel appeared mounted on a charger to lead the way. In the middle of the sea Gabriel approached the king and drew forth the royal warrant which has just been mentioned. Pharaoh on reading it und I the hidden meaning of Gabriel's proceedings and knew that the hour of his doom had would fain repent, but it was too late ; and the waters closed in on Pharaoh and his am Such traditions linger in these drear valleys, then, belonging to a very remote p and by these Mohammad's impressionable mind was instructed. The Arab of to-day and the Arab of former ages has always been fond of story and song. As we all know, the happiest memories our own childhood's imaginative years connect themselves with stories which come from a (av distant and mysterious Arabia. A legend slight and fragmentary attaching to some rock would soon get magnified and contorted so as to be scarcely recognisable by th first told it; passed on from one to another, it would gain power, and at length t an article of faith. A further reason why legend and tradition should grow rapidly and so readily in this 1 )esert district is to be found, perhaps, in the seclusion of the Arab's life from the outer world. He lives far from the madding crowd. Monotonous is the journey of his lil day is so much like another, and one journey is so undistinguishable from another, that anything with a pretence to singularity is sure to be remarked on and treasured up. on after having W&dy Gharandel one notices two heaps of stone called Manga/ Hisan Abu Zena ("The leap of Abu Zena's horse"); and this is the story. An Arab named Zena was riding a mare in foal, and notwithstanding her condition was riding at a furious pace When he came to this spot he dug his spurs into her sides, and the mare made a dremendC leap and fell down dead. Abu Zena, in amazement at the immense length of the stride wh the horse had taken, marked the distance with two stones, and afterwards related the mcidt to his friends, The matter was soon noised abroad, and every Arab who passed that WE) a comrade would discuss the marvellous leap, and trace out again the distance himself had done. Thus the stone heaps grew. Admiration for the mare's performance increased with the pagan Arabs of that time. She became at length an object oi alul WS hipped as a deity, offerings of corn being brought to the spot. But wh1 Arabs forsook idolatry for the worship of the true God they came to look upon their g0tl md turned their pagan observances into an expression "' avers**