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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 262
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 262. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/319.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 262. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/319

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 262, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/319.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 262
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_285.jpg
Transcript 262 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. and so come to Imran's house. The mother has hidden the child in the cold oven and g Her sister, not knowing this, comes in and lights a fire beneath the oven in order bake some bread. It was just when the fire had burned up that the soldiers forced the' way in. Every nook and corner of the house is searched in vain—the heated oven is oat of the question as a hiding-place. When they are gone the mother returns; she sees the oven heated—she tears her hair, beats her breast, scolds her sister. Then rushing to the oven to look at her roasted darling, she finds him alive and well and draws-him forth without a scorch! After this she thinks she may entrust him to the care of the Nile. And is that at the end of three days (some say forty) the child is wafted by a branch canal into a tank in the midst of Pharaoh's Palace. Pharaoh's daughters (seven) were afflicted with various diseases: the wonderful child cured them all by his touch, and was, in consequ promoted, after much coaxing of her husband on Asia's part, to be heir-apparent to the throne. When Moses reached the age of three years Pharaoh sent for him, and, capti by his pretty childish ways, set him upon his knee to play. Moses immediateb die beard with one hand and soundly boxed his ears with the other, at which sign of de authority all his old suspicions were revived, and Pharaoh again determined on putting him to death. This good intention Asia soon divined, and excused the child's conduct on tin- infantile thoughtlessness and foolishness. " I will soon convince you," said she, il that the boy is incapable of judging between right and wrong." She ordered a silver basin to be brought containing a date and a live ember, and setting the basin before Moses, commanded h: choose. As he was about to select the date the angel Gabriel appeared before him, struc hand upon the coal and made him carry it to his mouth. Of course his tongue was burned severely and he uttered dreadful howls. Pharaoh was now convinced that the boy was a fool. and from that hour Moses lisped in his speech. The cause of Moses' flight from Pharaoh's court was the fear of the blood feud which be the consequence of his killing an Egyptian who was abusing an Israelite. He i Midian. At the watering place outside the city he acted the part of a chivalrous knight to the daughters of Sho'eib, the blind prophet of Midian. The shepherds, when they had fill watering their own flocks, rolled a great stone over the mouth of the well, so that daughters should not share in the use of the water. Moses seeing this grew wroth, and gave huge boulder such a kick with his foot as to send it flying full forty cubits from the spot, .i hters watered their sheep. The two girls of course told their father of t he sent to Invite the stranger to his house. Then there comes the contract of eight ; »en • the eldest daughter Safura (Zipporah), and the suggested interval of quid We have already considered the tradition of the Burning Bush. The cont 1'haraoh's seventy thousand magicians and Moses assumes this shape: Th< I, Pharaoh is seated on an eminence commanding a wide valle) on which all the fashion of the Egyptian world is grouped. The magicians had provide hundred rital< . of ropes and sticks, and had so sprinkled magic dust on the