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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 261
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 261. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/318.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 261. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/318

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 261, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/318.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 261
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_284.jpg
Transcript SINAI. 26l Musa, by which one descends from Rds Sufsafeh to the mouth of Widy ed Deir), to visit his mother, and that Moses departed with his family from Midian towards Egypt; but coming to the valley of Towa, wherein Mount Sinai stands, his wife was taken in labour and delivered of a son in a very dark and snowy night. (One hardly thinks of snow in connection with Sinai, but when I made the ascent of Jebel Katharina there was a thin sprinkling of snow on the higher ranges; and when the Ordnance Survey party was engaged on the mountain in 1868 there was heavy snow.) Moses had also lost his way, and his cattle were scattered from him, when on a sudden he saw a fire by the side of a mountain, which, on his rearer approach, he saw burning in a green bush.* The sources from which Mohammad drew for the Koran, or Cor an, Wer^ for the most part Jewish. He was an enthusiast who, being confronted with strange and perplexing difficulties, tried to grapple with these difficulties by the light he saw and felt within himself. Ignorant, impressible, superstitious, carried away by circumstances, may W£ not think rather thus of him, than as a mere charlatan and impostor ? His earlier life as a sfr^ph^rd on the hills gave him the true shepherd's love for nature, and apprenticed hirn in those long soul- communings which equipped him to be the prophet of a nation. His later adventurous life as a camel-driver to the Syrian caravans must have brought him into contact with Jewish merchants and hanifs t who would visit the great markets. Jewish legends abound both in the Cor an and in the " Speeches," and one may suppose that these legends had be^n in part collected by Mohammad during his sojourn in Sinai, and in part learned from the Jewish tribe of Mecca, the Kheibari, whom Dr. Wolff supposed to be descendants of the Rechabites of Jeremiah's time. If this were so, then in these legends we possess very old Jewish folklore indeed. Here are some of the legends strung together by Professor Palmer out of the commentaries on the Cor an, which may well be read as we make another halt to gaze seawards and sketch the form of Jebel Hammam Far un. The Pharaoh of the Exodus was 2 just and vigorous prince, and his reign was protracted to an unusual length (this suggests Raises 11., the Greek Sesostris). He became infatuated with pride and rebelled against God, claiming for himself divine honours. He married Asia. Of such beauty and goodness was she, that it was said of her that God, when asked by the angels, marvelling at the beauty of the Houris of Paradise, whether he had created aught lovelier, answered, " Yea, I have created Asia and Mary and Fatimah." Pharaoh was warned on first entering his wife's bridal apartment by an invisible monitor of his approaching end, and of the overthrow of his dominion by the hands of a prophet from among the sons of Israel. It was this that caused him to issue the fierce decree against the male children who should be born to the Israelitish women. Then comes the mysterious midnight voice which tells him " Moses is born and Pharaoh's doom draws nigh." The soldiery are sent out everywhere to seek for and destroy the child, * Taken chiefly from Sale's" Koran." t , , t Hanif, •< incline*." Just before Mohammad's time there had been a strange stirring amongst the tetter cla*** 0i Arabs who *ere dissatisfied with the low fetishism of their countrymen, and were seeking the " religion of Abraham," the father of th*ir progenitor Ishmael. y these men (hanifs) a change was declared to be at hand, and a prophet about to arise. 95 mm