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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 259
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 259. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/316.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 259. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/316

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 259, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/316.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 259
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_282.jpg
Transcript II*1 ■I SINAI. 259 a medicated vapour bath. A dip at the point where the hot water meets the cool waves is delightful, as the temperature may be graduated at pleasure by moving a few feet either way. Our first bathe was brought to a premature conclusion by the appearance of a huge shark, which suddenly rose within a few feet of where I was standing, and continued to sail gracefully round and round the spot, waiting for a favourable opportunity to snap at the legs of the first person who should venture into the water. We watched his ominous black fin glittering for some time in the light of the setting sun and then turned back to camp." Professor Palmer tells us that no Arab ventures to prove the efficacy of these baths for die too-frequent rheumatic pains to which he is exposed— owing not only to the bleak air of the mountains, but to the immense difference of the temperature of the day and the night— without bringing an offering to propitiate the angry ghost of the Egyptian king. This offering is usually a cake made of certain stated quantities of meal, oil, &c. He gives us at length, too, the Arab legend of the Baths :— 11 When our Lord Moses had quarrelled with Pharaoh and determined to lead the children of Israel out of Egypt, he found himself stopped by the salt sea. At the command of God Most High, however, he raised his staff and smote upon the waters, whereupon they parted on the right hand and on the left, and the children of Israel found a dry passage in the bottom of the deep. Then Pharaoh and his soldiery essayed to follow, but when they had come midway Moses again raised his staff, and, smiting the waters, said, * Return, O sea, into thy former course !' and the waters closed over the Egyptians, and the children of Israel saw the corpses of their enemies floating on the waves. But Pharaoh was a mighty man and struggled with the billows ; then seeing Moses standing on the rock above him, he waxed exceeding wroth, and gave so fierce a gasp that the waters boiled up as they closed over his drowning head. Since that time the angry ghost of the King of Egypt has haunted the deep; and should any unfortunate vessel come near the spot he rises up and overwhelms it in the waves, so that to the present day no ship can sail on Pharaoh's Lake." The whole peninsula is a hot-bed of tradition and traditional sites, planted and carefully tended not only by Christian but by Mohammadan. Take those only relating to Moses, which are of constant recurrence, and which give a sort of atmosphere of evidence to the conjectures which establish the mountain of Sinai as the scene of God's conference with Moses and of the giving the Law. There are the " Wells of Moses" from which we started on our Desert journey. In the Convent of St. Katharine (see vignette on title-page, vol. ii.) we have the Well where he watered his sheep, of which there is the Arab replica in the cool and shady cave on the side of Jebel Musa, higher up and above the convent, which the monks only point out as the hermitage of a cobbler saint (see page 237). Any spot whose surroundings were strange or magnificent became associated in the Arab's mind with the grand figure of the Hebrew Lawgiver, even to the exclusion of Mohammad himself, and in this possibly there is a shadow of testimony for the greater antiquity of the Moses legends. The rivalry between the monks of Feiran and those of Jebel Musa would be sure to bring into existence a double series of