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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 250
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 250. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/307.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 250. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/307

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 250, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/307.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 250
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_273.jpg
Transcript 2SO PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. It is at this part of the journey that one dreads a sand-storm (see page 253), the so to Speak, of those newly reared hills of sand and fresh dug out valleys, which we I 1 traversing all through the day. Such a storm overtook Dean Stanley's party in 1 -The day after leaving Wyun Musa was at first within sight of the blue channel of the | But SOOn Red Sea and all were lost in a sand-storm, which lasted the whole day, e all distant objects entirely lost to view ; the sheets of sand fleeting along the suri of the : reams of water ; the whole air filled, though invisibly, with a tempc »nd, driving in your face like sleet. Imagine the caravan toiling against this, the Bedawin 1 with his shawl thrown completely over his head, half of the riders sitting backwards, dels meantime thus virtually left without guidance, though from time to time throv their I to avoid the blast, yet moving straight onwards with a painful • of duty truly edifying to behold. I had thought that with the Nile our trouble wind were over; but (another analogy for the Ships of the Desert) the great saddle-bags Ail lis to th<- camels, and therefore, with a contrary wind are serious impediments to their > Through the tempest, this roaring and driving tempest, which sometimes made me think that this must be the real meaning of a howling wilderness (I )eut. \\.\ii H the whole day." ("Sinai and Palestine/1 p. 68.) I hi the eveni econd day from 'Ayiin Miisa we reached'Ain Haww&rah There IS a Stunted palm tree, or perhaps one might say a small thick': ted palms, shadii pring of brackish water nn the slope <•! .1 ridge: and that is all. I Ik- dark green <>f the tree against the glaring sand makes it a conspicuous object OIM The Aral tO you, looking wistfully at the spring, " M urrah " (" bitter it is this, probably, which has given rise to the conjecture that here is the spring "Marah, which the Israelites found to be bitter (Exodus w. 23). The water at this spring vai in quantity -md also in quality. Robinson ("Biblical Researches/1 voL L) thought the u unpleasant, bitter, and saltish in taste, but not worse than the water at the M Wells of Mo His V tld him that it was the worst water in the district, but their camels drank ol eely. Pi> Palmer found the water palatable. Mr. Holland, well acquainted with pronounced its purity to be \er\ exceptional Some glamour has been cast< the identification of this fountain with Marah from the fact that it has been ino called Win Hawarah, "Fount o( Destruction," whereas its proper name. Ilawwarah. sigr a "small pool/1 the water of which gradually sinks into the sink leaving the residue unfit to drink. Some twenty minim > beyond this pool a little plain is reached in a hollow called II 'ul ("the Bean The water stands here after mueh rain, maki; oil of rich loam. rhis patch rund, the onlj spot fit for cultivation for miles round, is diligentl) cultivi md. if there is rain, a good crop ma) be reaped oi barlej or bea I'rom this point on, , into broken country, and, were it nol for the want the change would be m< 1 bristly ridge, a fine view is obtained of the Of I lammam larYin, " Pharaoh's 1 lot Bath." Those great chalk *** mW