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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 243
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 243. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 243. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/300

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 243, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 243
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_266.jpg
Transcript SINAI. 243 of wind-tossed sand mounds, which form the entire landscape (see page 249). What marvellous shells !- the shells one has so often looked at in London fancy shops mounted as flower vases! What strange waifs and strays of sea and desert life ! The lights are beginning to show in the mighty ships which are lying in the Suez anchorage, and there is a faintness of distinctness about the white buildings and the minaret which mark out the town itself (see page 248), lying at the feet of the purple mountain out of which the glow of sunset has just faded. That is Africa, and of that mysterious continent the strip of land— the valley with its mighty river—behind those mountains is the greatest marvel. Now let us turn and watch the stars, which seem so much larger and brighter than they are in the English sky, come out, from our encampment under the tall, ragged, weather-beaten palm- tree, which may have stood as a sentry looking over the thirsty desert, stretched across the whole base of the triangle of the Sinaitic peninsula, for countless ages. The loneliness is very intense. Yet there is an intermittent murmur of laughter and merriment from the group of Arabs round the encampment fire, which begins to shoot forth a cheerful light on the white canvas of our two small English tents. And who are these Arabs ? and why should one be obliged to have their company, or at any rate the company of any except those to whom the camels belong and who act as camel-men ? The track is not hard to find, and the watering places are well known. These Arabs are the ghufard, or protectors, without whose escort the traveller would not be safe in the Peninsula or in the Desert. They belong to the tribes which have the legitimate right to give protection to the Convent and to travellers. The country under their protection is accurately defined and recognised by other Bedawin ; and while under their care and within the limits of their protectorate one is safe. The name of the tribe occupying the Sinaitic peninsula is Towarah (sing. Turi), from " Tor," the seaport on the south-west of the peninsula, with which word is connected the old Arab term for the peninsula. The Towarah are divided into several tribes, the most despised of which is the Jibaliyeh, whom we shall find at the Convent acting as servants, porters, agricultural labourers, &c. There is a chapter in Professor Palmer's " Desert of the Exodus" (chap, v.) which gives a capital description of them, etched in with the gentlest, most sympathizing, but most masterly hand. He points out that the prevalent idea of the nomade character of the Arabs is incorrect; no people wander less, and no people (the eager desire one's Arabs display to reach home, when home is near, is the best evidence of this) are more attached to their native homes. So difficult to find m European languages, in Arabic we find a word corresponding with our " home," viz. watan. They have, though innocent of many built villages and towns, summer and winter camping grounds, and make at the proper season a regular exodus from one to the other. The Arab has no history, because there is no nationality; and so one does not meet with any annals breathing of heroism and chivalry such as Scotland can produce. There is some clanship between the members of a tribe, and the fierce laws of blood-feud keep this up ; but there is nothing more.