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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 231
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 231. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 231. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/288

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 231, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 231
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_254.jpg
Transcript iTT'-- THE CONVENT OF ST. CATHERINE. 2%x El Sharif, and a sandy plain (called by the Bedawin "Tihamat Madyan ") slopes from them towards the shore cliffs. The Hajj route to Mecca can be distinguished running diagonally in a south-easterly direction across the plain, from Hakl, a pilgrim station on the sea-shore, towards the distant mountains. The Christian Hajj road pursues its way southwards along the widening sandy shore, till at a short distance south of the great chasm of Wady Wetir, and just opposite a brackish fountain surrounded by dwarf palm-trees, called 'Ain en Nuweibi'a, it turns abruptly from the sea-shore and enters the great mountain range by the picturesque ravine, Nukb el Abweib (the little door). From this point the convent is about fifty miles due south-west, and the camel road approaches it in as direct a line as is possible in a land of mountains and precipices. After traversing the Wady Samghi, it issues out into a plain of sandstone veined with granite and deoderite, then it runs through wadys and over steep slopes to another plain, El Ghor, soon passing near to 'Ain el Hudhera, which probably represents Hazeroth (Numbers xi. 35). In its neighbourhood there are several connected wadys called Mawarid el Hudhera (paths to Hudhera), indicating that it was once an important place. After crossing the Wady Murrah, the road runs along the wide plain of Wady Sa'al. Here seyal or tulil trees (acacias) grow to a considerable size, with thin foliage and a multitude of thorns. From them gum arabic is sometimes gathered. The road now enters a narrow branch of Wady Sa'al, a gloomy valley shut in between high desolate mountains of granite, veined with porphyry and slate, and here and there crested with sandstone, all entirely destitute of vegetation ; a few scattered shrubs and herbs, however, grow in the bottom of the valley. Emerging from this wady, the road rises over a rocky pass to the summit of a ridge, said by Robinson to be the water-parting " between the waters flowing to the Gulf of Suez and those running to the Gulf of 'Akabah." It presently descends to the Wady Suweiriyeh, in which there is a well with enclosed gardens near it, called Abu Suweiriyeh. This wady enters the broad Wady esh Sheikh (Saleh), near to a Mohammedan wely, four thousand four hundred and seventy-nine feet above the sea, dedicated to Neby Saleh (the prophet Saleh), who is highly revered by the Bedawin. Like the generality of welys, it is a cubical structure covered with a dome, and whitewashed. It contains a cenotaph with numerous votive offerings suspended above it, consisting chiefly of tassels, shawls, ostrich effffs, camels' halters and bridles. The Tawarah Bedawin (the Bedawin of Tur, i.e. Sinai) regard Neby Saleh as their ancestor ; he was probably, however, the celebrated Mohammedan prophet of the same name, who at an early period was renowned for his eloquence, and who is extolled in the Koran as one of the most venerable of patriarchs (see Sale's Koran, chap, vii., called " El Araf." In the notes to this chapter will be found the curious legends concerning Saleh). Every May a great festival takes place at the shrine of Neby Saleh, accompanied with sacrifices, feastings, and games, at which women are also present; and a smaller festival is held immediately after the date harvest. At the close of the proceedings all present ascend to the summit of Jebel Musa, and there offer sacrifices to Moses. From the shrine of Neby Saleh